Learn how Aspen University is responding to COVID-19.

The 2021 Graduation is Happening Friday, October 29th, 2021! Learn More Here!


Transfer your credits, and gain a full understanding of early childhood educational development and behavior.


The Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Studies (Completion Program) is a degree designed for students who have earned an associate’s degree, or a minimum of 60 college credits, looking to earn their Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Studies.

This program equips you with the skills needed to begin, or advance in, careers in child care and early childhood studies (from birth through age eight or third grade). The program is not designed as a teacher certification program nor does it lead to state licensure.

Enjoy Flexibility – 20 courses with start dates every 2 weeks
Choose Where You Learn – 100% online courses
Affordable Monthly Payments – Opt to pay $250 per month

The Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Studies is aligned with the professional standards in the field, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). This program provides you with multi-disciplined knowledge, insights, and strategies that you can apply to the job right away. You will receive a comprehensive education that includes specialized courses covering ECS-specific topics such as child development, educational psychology, and curriculum design.

The mission of the Early Childhood Studies program is to educate students whose goal is to work or advance in fields of child care and early childhood education programs. Successful completion of the program may enable graduates to work with age-appropriate child care organizations, early childhood education programs, preschools, private kindergartens, private elementary schools, and Head Start programs. Additional information about the Head Start and Early Head Start programs can be found at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website.

If you do not have previous credits, check our our Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Studies program.

Admission Requirements

  • Application – A completed application.
  • Completion Qualification – Completion of an associate’s degree or 60 college credits from an institution that is accredited by a CHEA recognized accrediting body or an international equivalent.
  • Official Transcripts – Official transcripts for all previous college credit earned.
  • Minimum GPA Requirement – A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 is required for all previous high school or college credit.
  • Military Documentation (Optional) – A copy of the most recent orders; or a copy of DD214 (This can be requested from the National Archives.)

Courses:

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the idea that that interacting with the early childhood student extends beyond education programs that focus on child-centered care to family-centered practices, taking into account that the early education student always comes to school in a context. UrieBronfenbrenner’s ecological model of human development is introduced to emphasize the numerous influences on early childhood students, including families, teachers, schools, communities, and so forth. This course explores how building relationships with families requires inclusive collaboration, effective communication, and ongoing development for parents and the adults in the early childhood student’s lives. This course examines developmental theory and adds diverse perspectives from a base of solid academics, constructivist theory, and the experiences of the author of the text.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course emphasizes the process of developing human potential in early childhood students by consciously applying principles of guidance, a process that is in keeping with the current emphasis on ""intentional guidance"" in the early childhood field. Those principles are based upon child development theory and research, as well as upon the knowledge, beliefs and values gained through many years of experience through work with young children and their families, with early childhood professionals, and with students preparing for careers with young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The quantitative approach involves using numbers to help define, describe, and resolve a wide range of business problems. Quantitative Methods is an overview of statistical techniques used in business decision-making. Students examine research design, statistics, data analysis, and research methodology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a basic foundation of skills needed to equip students for future leadership activities. It introduces the history, philosophy, theories, and concepts of leadership and its relationship to the management of organizational change. Students identify and hone their own personal characteristics that will help them develop into effective leaders.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the biological, physical, perceptual, moral, and socioemotional nature of development in children from their prenatal beginnings through their early years. Learning objectives include developing an understanding about children’s care as well as exploring diversity, careers, and research in child development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the idea that that interacting with the early childhood student extends beyond education programs that focus on child-centered care to family-centered practices, taking into account that the early education student always comes to school in a context. UrieBronfenbrenner’s ecological model of human development is introduced to emphasize the numerous influences on early childhood students, including families, teachers, schools, communities, and so forth. This course explores how building relationships with families requires inclusive collaboration, effective communication, and ongoing development for parents and the adults in the early childhood student’s lives. This course examines developmental theory and adds diverse perspectives from a base of solid academics, constructivist theory, and the experiences of the author of the text.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course emphasizes the process of developing human potential in early childhood students by consciously applying principles of guidance, a process that is in keeping with the current emphasis on ""intentional guidance"" in the early childhood field. Those principles are based upon child development theory and research, as well as upon the knowledge, beliefs and values gained through many years of experience through work with young children and their families, with early childhood professionals, and with students preparing for careers with young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The quantitative approach involves using numbers to help define, describe, and resolve a wide range of business problems. Quantitative Methods is an overview of statistical techniques used in business decision-making. Students examine research design, statistics, data analysis, and research methodology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a basic foundation of skills needed to equip students for future leadership activities. It introduces the history, philosophy, theories, and concepts of leadership and its relationship to the management of organizational change. Students identify and hone their own personal characteristics that will help them develop into effective leaders.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the biological, physical, perceptual, moral, and socioemotional nature of development in children from their prenatal beginnings through their early years. Learning objectives include developing an understanding about children’s care as well as exploring diversity, careers, and research in child development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the idea that that interacting with the early childhood student extends beyond education programs that focus on child-centered care to family-centered practices, taking into account that the early education student always comes to school in a context. UrieBronfenbrenner’s ecological model of human development is introduced to emphasize the numerous influences on early childhood students, including families, teachers, schools, communities, and so forth. This course explores how building relationships with families requires inclusive collaboration, effective communication, and ongoing development for parents and the adults in the early childhood student’s lives. This course examines developmental theory and adds diverse perspectives from a base of solid academics, constructivist theory, and the experiences of the author of the text.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course emphasizes the process of developing human potential in early childhood students by consciously applying principles of guidance, a process that is in keeping with the current emphasis on ""intentional guidance"" in the early childhood field. Those principles are based upon child development theory and research, as well as upon the knowledge, beliefs and values gained through many years of experience through work with young children and their families, with early childhood professionals, and with students preparing for careers with young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The quantitative approach involves using numbers to help define, describe, and resolve a wide range of business problems. Quantitative Methods is an overview of statistical techniques used in business decision-making. Students examine research design, statistics, data analysis, and research methodology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a basic foundation of skills needed to equip students for future leadership activities. It introduces the history, philosophy, theories, and concepts of leadership and its relationship to the management of organizational change. Students identify and hone their own personal characteristics that will help them develop into effective leaders.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the biological, physical, perceptual, moral, and socioemotional nature of development in children from their prenatal beginnings through their early years. Learning objectives include developing an understanding about children’s care as well as exploring diversity, careers, and research in child development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course identifies how to modify  learning activities for both the early childhood and special education student. Students develop and understand a variety of education practices for teaching the early childhood student with exceptionalities. This course allows the student to develop greater versatility in his/her chosen field as they explore alternative early interventionist careers in the field. Early childhood students with exceptionalities are now enrolled in a variety of settings and are served by professionals and paraprofessionals with diverse backgrounds and expertise in the field. Our objective now is to present a course that plays a major role in the development of all who serve early childhood students.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The factors addressed in Infant and Toddler Mental Health prepares future professionals who work with Infants and Toddlers with exceptionalities with specialized knowledge, training, and experience. This course provides an excellent overview for the beginning professional in this field. In looking toward the future of early intervention and early childhood special education, the core values and approaches early childhood specialists and developmental psychologists have long advocated for, continue to guide the development and evaluation of effective practices in working with both students and families. In the era of accountability, this course prepares professionals who work with early childhood students with exceptionalities how to demonstrate that the services provided result in improved outcomes for students and families.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course was written for early childhood professionals of students from birth to 8 years of age. It was prepared in response to the need for present and future professionals to understand the role of the early childhood student’s development within the curriculum. In this course, the curriculum discussed is planned for the early childhood stages. Attention is given to increased legislation and mandatory testing that affects how teachers are expected to teach early childhood students. This course explores national and state goals and standards in the language arts and mathematics with strategies for how these specific standards may be met with appropriate learning activities.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the idea that that interacting with the early childhood student extends beyond education programs that focus on child-centered care to family-centered practices, taking into account that the early education student always comes to school in a context. UrieBronfenbrenner’s ecological model of human development is introduced to emphasize the numerous influences on early childhood students, including families, teachers, schools, communities, and so forth. This course explores how building relationships with families requires inclusive collaboration, effective communication, and ongoing development for parents and the adults in the early childhood student’s lives. This course examines developmental theory and adds diverse perspectives from a base of solid academics, constructivist theory, and the experiences of the author of the text.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course emphasizes the process of developing human potential in early childhood students by consciously applying principles of guidance, a process that is in keeping with the current emphasis on ""intentional guidance"" in the early childhood field. Those principles are based upon child development theory and research, as well as upon the knowledge, beliefs and values gained through many years of experience through work with young children and their families, with early childhood professionals, and with students preparing for careers with young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The quantitative approach involves using numbers to help define, describe, and resolve a wide range of business problems. Quantitative Methods is an overview of statistical techniques used in business decision-making. Students examine research design, statistics, data analysis, and research methodology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a basic foundation of skills needed to equip students for future leadership activities. It introduces the history, philosophy, theories, and concepts of leadership and its relationship to the management of organizational change. Students identify and hone their own personal characteristics that will help them develop into effective leaders.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the biological, physical, perceptual, moral, and socioemotional nature of development in children from their prenatal beginnings through their early years. Learning objectives include developing an understanding about children’s care as well as exploring diversity, careers, and research in child development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with current information for developing an integrated approach to curriculum in the early years of education. This course intends to bridge the worlds of child-care and early education, as well as those of preprimary and primary programs. In addition, it addresses early childhood education professionals working in settings with young children from birth to age 8. The ideas in this course have been extensively field tested and found to be effective. All are designed to give students a cohesive view of the what, why, and how of developmentally appropriate practices. This course is valuable to a broad range of early childhood professionals.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of the Language Development course is to provide early childhood professionals with a foundation of knowledge needed to develop learning environments where language development is enhanced. This course is designed to examine effective learning activities that are appropriate for the early childhood student’s motivation and development. This course reviews language acquisition assessments used to determine the early childhood student’s level of progress and the appropriateness of each learning experience. Students review how to recognize the beginning of the early childhood student’s language development and communicative competencies through the critical nature of parent-infant interactions established through eye contact, shared reference, and turn-taking,.  Students analyze early attempts at writing by invented spelling, while reflecting on how to respond to the writing and provide learning activities that enhance the development of literacy. 

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on how literacy develops in young children and the ways in which early childhood professionals can encourage the natural emergence of early reading and writing. This course emphasizes multicultural children's literature and introduces professionals to a variety of multicultural children’s books. This course provides practical supports and strategies for early childhood professionals, such as how to set up a literacy friendly environment, and it provides many suggestions for using classroom materials and centers to support literacy. This course also discusses in detail articles from various researchers in the field, and analyzes a variety of topics that affect the early childhood professional. This course offers an effective approach for guiding early literacy in preschool, and is applicable to most early childhood professionals.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is a practical guide to understanding and using a child-centered philosophy. The philosophy presented in this course is balanced, and child-centered. This course addresses the developmental needs and abilities of early childhood students and enables professionals to implement high standards for behavior. The problem solving philosophy analyzed in this course emphasizes the early childhood student’s ability to solve their own problems when they are trusted and encouraged to do so. It contains the basic theoretical information needed to understand problem solving, yet its emphasis is on application, on working with groups of children in early childhood settings on a daily basis.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores creating and managing a developmentally appropriate early childhood settings. Topics include young children's growth and development, long-term and short-term planning, room arrangements, center ideas, and scheduling and management.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the vital importance of play as a developmental tool, supporting all those who work in the early childhood field and who care in developing and implementing the highest quality play experiences for young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course combines a child-centered philosophy with problem-solving strategies and a thorough discussion of diversity. This is an ideal introduction to curriculum and care for infants and toddlers. This course reviews the Ten Principles that are the underlying framework for early childhood studies and reviews respectful techniques on the part of caregivers. In addition, this course emphasizes honoring diversity and infant-toddler exceptionalities while analyzing the latest research in brain development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a guide for thoughtful consideration of classroom and caregiver practices in preschool & school age settings. The two periods covered in this course are the prenatal period (9 months) and infancy and toddlerhood (birth to 2 years of age).

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course builds on the foundational principles presented in ECE 409 (Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Infant and Toddler Settings) with an introduction to early child development. The focuses of this course include appropriate assessment practices during these developmental years. The two periods covered in this course are the development of young children and children are of school age (middle childhood).

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed for individuals who are preparing to become early childhood educators. This course prepares students to measure or evaluate early childhood students and analyzes the differences between assessing this age range versus that of older students. This course includes discussion of assessment in the early childhood years written from a developmental perspective.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers observation techniques for assessing child development in the emotional, social, physical, cognitive, language, and creative areas of development.  Students learn methods and techniques for assessing child development supplemented with exercises and study of how to best apply an understanding of early cognition in order to develop a nurturing and beneficial educational setting for young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on early childhood studies by examining theories related to development and learning and provides examples of methods and practices best implemented to ensure healthy, well-rounded development of children in the early childhood education setting. This course also presents current education legislation related to testing, assessment and curriculum development and the effect that this legislation has on the field of early childhood. Students study nutrition, play, and the importance of creativity with a focus on practices designed to assist children with exceptionalities. This course examines cultural awareness in the classroom and how to be aware of multi-cultural issues in a diverse classroom. Students complete assignments to ensure comprehension of the material presented in the course as well as field activities in the classroom or with children in a variety of settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this individualized capstone experience is to enable students, to develop an original, comprehensive research project on a topic of professional or personal interest. This project-based course is designed to encourage students to draw upon knowledge and experience gained over the course of program. The project allows students the opportunity to integrate additional related educational or professional development activities. Projects are intended to be of applied and pragmatic nature, producing valuable research outcomes and findings either in connection with the student’s organizational situation, or in the exploration of entrepreneurial opportunities.

    3 Credits
    Required Books
Chat