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Transfer your credits, and gain a full understanding of early childhood educational development and behavior.


The Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education (Completion Program) is a degree designed for students who have earned an associate’s degree, or a minimum of 60 college credits, looking to earn their Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education.

This program equips you with the skills needed to begin, or advance in, careers in child care and early childhood education (from birth through age eight or third grade). The program is not designed as a teacher certification program nor does it lead to state licensure.

Enjoy Flexibility – 20 courses with start dates every 2 weeks
Choose Where You Learn – 100% online courses
Affordable Monthly Payments – Opt to pay $250 per month

The Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education is aligned with the professional standards in the field, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). This program provides you with multi-disciplined knowledge, insights, and strategies that you can apply to the job right away. You will receive a comprehensive education that includes specialized courses covering ECE-specific topics such as child development, educational psychology, and curriculum design.

The mission of the Early Childhood Education program is to educate students whose goal is to work or advance in fields of child care and early childhood education programs. Successful completion of the program may enable graduates to work with age-appropriate child care organizations, early childhood education programs, preschools, kindergartens, elementary schools, and Head Start programs. Additional information about the Head Start and Early Head Start programs can be found at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website.

Admission Requirements

  • Application – A completed application.
  • Completion Qualification – Completion of an associate’s degree or 60 college credits from an institution that is accredited by a CHEA recognized accrediting body or an international equivalent.
  • Official Transcripts – Official transcripts for all previous college credit earned.
  • Minimum GPA Requirement – A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 is required for all previous high school or college credit.
  • Military Documentation (Optional) – A copy of the most recent orders; or a copy of DD214 (This can be requested from the National Archives.)

Courses:


    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course emphasizes the process of developing human potential in early childhood students by consciously applying principles of guidance, a process that is in keeping with the current emphasis on ""intentional teaching"" in the early childhood field. Those principles are based upon child development theory and research, as well as upon the knowledge, beliefs and values gained through many years of experience through work with young children and their families, with early childhood professionals, and with students preparing for careers with young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    In this course we have chosen to emphasize what we consider the key challenge for educators in the twenty-first century—responding to multiple perspectives in a changing world. By multiple perspectives we mean educators must consider, reflect, and respond to divergent ideas drawn from different disciplines of study, different points of view, different experiences, different contexts, and different voices. Students come to this course with perspectives of their own based on unique personal experiences, cultures, and communities. During this course, you will be exposed to other perspectives, values, cultures, and points of view. This course helps you analyze these divergent perspectives through academic disciplines including history, philosophy, politics, sociology, and the law. These new perspectives will interact with your own views and ultimately influence your role as a teacher. This process of analyzing and responding to differences does not end when you enter the teaching profession; different perspectives continue to emerge and your response to them changes as your own unique career path evolves. Multiple perspectives provide points of view that can enhance your own understanding of the changing world. By change we acknowledge the fast-paced world of information that influences you and your experiences. Your identity as a teacher emerges and evolves in response to this unending road of changes. The anchor that we provide in this sometimes chaotic and confusing world is the anchor of reflection and analysis. Throughout this course, we provide numerous opportunities to make sense of the changes in the world, to determine a reflective response to the present, and to adjust your response as new changes emerge. This course also presents a broad perspective of the changing world with a view to a global economy and global citizenship.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the biological, physical, perceptual, moral, and socioemotional nature of development in children from their prenatal beginnings through their early years. Learning objectives include developing an understanding about children’s care as well as exploring diversity, careers, and research in child development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Early childhood education is of concern to everyone who wants to live in an economically sound democracy. Although the early years have been traditionally the domain of early childhood professionals and parents, the rest of the society is beginning now to pay attention to what research has been telling us for a long time: “The first years last forever,” as the slogan goes. Early care and education isn’t just about preparing individuals for success in life, but also about giving them the kind of experiences that make them productive citizens of a democratic society. In quality early care and education programs, children not only gain the foundations they need for school success and beyond, but they also learn to interact with cooperative ways with others, the basis for gaining a sense of community. A good beginning in a high quality early care and education program can lead to both social and economic benefits and is a great investment for the society to make. It’s the kind of investment that will grow from generation to generation. Individuals reap the benefits of this investment and so does society.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an overview of teaching strategies from infants to the early elementary grades. It also covers the history and theories of teaching and learning, as well as how to implement these strategies in early childhood programs.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course emphasizes the process of developing human potential in early childhood students by consciously applying principles of guidance, a process that is in keeping with the current emphasis on ""intentional teaching"" in the early childhood field. Those principles are based upon child development theory and research, as well as upon the knowledge, beliefs and values gained through many years of experience through work with young children and their families, with early childhood professionals, and with students preparing for careers with young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    In this course we have chosen to emphasize what we consider the key challenge for educators in the twenty-first century—responding to multiple perspectives in a changing world. By multiple perspectives we mean educators must consider, reflect, and respond to divergent ideas drawn from different disciplines of study, different points of view, different experiences, different contexts, and different voices. Students come to this course with perspectives of their own based on unique personal experiences, cultures, and communities. During this course, you will be exposed to other perspectives, values, cultures, and points of view. This course helps you analyze these divergent perspectives through academic disciplines including history, philosophy, politics, sociology, and the law. These new perspectives will interact with your own views and ultimately influence your role as a teacher. This process of analyzing and responding to differences does not end when you enter the teaching profession; different perspectives continue to emerge and your response to them changes as your own unique career path evolves. Multiple perspectives provide points of view that can enhance your own understanding of the changing world. By change we acknowledge the fast-paced world of information that influences you and your experiences. Your identity as a teacher emerges and evolves in response to this unending road of changes. The anchor that we provide in this sometimes chaotic and confusing world is the anchor of reflection and analysis. Throughout this course, we provide numerous opportunities to make sense of the changes in the world, to determine a reflective response to the present, and to adjust your response as new changes emerge. This course also presents a broad perspective of the changing world with a view to a global economy and global citizenship.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the biological, physical, perceptual, moral, and socioemotional nature of development in children from their prenatal beginnings through their early years. Learning objectives include developing an understanding about children’s care as well as exploring diversity, careers, and research in child development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Early childhood education is of concern to everyone who wants to live in an economically sound democracy. Although the early years have been traditionally the domain of early childhood professionals and parents, the rest of the society is beginning now to pay attention to what research has been telling us for a long time: “The first years last forever,” as the slogan goes. Early care and education isn’t just about preparing individuals for success in life, but also about giving them the kind of experiences that make them productive citizens of a democratic society. In quality early care and education programs, children not only gain the foundations they need for school success and beyond, but they also learn to interact with cooperative ways with others, the basis for gaining a sense of community. A good beginning in a high quality early care and education program can lead to both social and economic benefits and is a great investment for the society to make. It’s the kind of investment that will grow from generation to generation. Individuals reap the benefits of this investment and so does society.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an overview of teaching strategies from infants to the early elementary grades. It also covers the history and theories of teaching and learning, as well as how to implement these strategies in early childhood programs.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course emphasizes the process of developing human potential in early childhood students by consciously applying principles of guidance, a process that is in keeping with the current emphasis on ""intentional teaching"" in the early childhood field. Those principles are based upon child development theory and research, as well as upon the knowledge, beliefs and values gained through many years of experience through work with young children and their families, with early childhood professionals, and with students preparing for careers with young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    In this course we have chosen to emphasize what we consider the key challenge for educators in the twenty-first century—responding to multiple perspectives in a changing world. By multiple perspectives we mean educators must consider, reflect, and respond to divergent ideas drawn from different disciplines of study, different points of view, different experiences, different contexts, and different voices. Students come to this course with perspectives of their own based on unique personal experiences, cultures, and communities. During this course, you will be exposed to other perspectives, values, cultures, and points of view. This course helps you analyze these divergent perspectives through academic disciplines including history, philosophy, politics, sociology, and the law. These new perspectives will interact with your own views and ultimately influence your role as a teacher. This process of analyzing and responding to differences does not end when you enter the teaching profession; different perspectives continue to emerge and your response to them changes as your own unique career path evolves. Multiple perspectives provide points of view that can enhance your own understanding of the changing world. By change we acknowledge the fast-paced world of information that influences you and your experiences. Your identity as a teacher emerges and evolves in response to this unending road of changes. The anchor that we provide in this sometimes chaotic and confusing world is the anchor of reflection and analysis. Throughout this course, we provide numerous opportunities to make sense of the changes in the world, to determine a reflective response to the present, and to adjust your response as new changes emerge. This course also presents a broad perspective of the changing world with a view to a global economy and global citizenship.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the biological, physical, perceptual, moral, and socioemotional nature of development in children from their prenatal beginnings through their early years. Learning objectives include developing an understanding about children’s care as well as exploring diversity, careers, and research in child development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Early childhood education is of concern to everyone who wants to live in an economically sound democracy. Although the early years have been traditionally the domain of early childhood professionals and parents, the rest of the society is beginning now to pay attention to what research has been telling us for a long time: “The first years last forever,” as the slogan goes. Early care and education isn’t just about preparing individuals for success in life, but also about giving them the kind of experiences that make them productive citizens of a democratic society. In quality early care and education programs, children not only gain the foundations they need for school success and beyond, but they also learn to interact with cooperative ways with others, the basis for gaining a sense of community. A good beginning in a high quality early care and education program can lead to both social and economic benefits and is a great investment for the society to make. It’s the kind of investment that will grow from generation to generation. Individuals reap the benefits of this investment and so does society.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an overview of teaching strategies from infants to the early elementary grades. It also covers the history and theories of teaching and learning, as well as how to implement these strategies in early childhood programs.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course identifies how to modify the learning and instruction for both the early childhood and special education student.. Students develop and understand a variety of education practices for teaching the early childhood student with exceptionalities. This course allows the student to develop greater versatility in his/her chosen field as they explore alternative early interventionist careers in the field. Early childhood students with exceptionalities are now enrolled in a variety of settings and are served by professionals and paraprofessionals with diverse backgrounds and expertise in the field. Our objective now is to present a course that play a major role in the development of all who serve early childhood students.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The factors addressed in Infant and Toddler Mental Health prepares future professionals who work with Infants and Toddlers with exceptionalities with specialized knowledge, training, and experience. This course provides an excellent overview for the beginning professional in this field. In looking toward the future of early intervention and early childhood special education, the core values and approaches early childhood specialists and developmental psychologists have long advocated for, continue to guide the development and evaluation of effective practices in working with both students and families. In the era of accountability, this course prepares professionals who work with early childhood students with exceptionalities how to demonstrate that the services provided result in improved outcomes for students and families.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course was written for teachers of students from birth to 8 years of age. It was prepared in response to the need for present and future teachers to understand the role of the early childhood student’s development within the curriculum. In this course, the curriculum discussed is planned for the infant stages, whether in a childcare, private preschool, or public school setting. Attention is given to increased legislation and mandatory testing that affects how teachers are expected to teach early childhood students. This course explores national and state goals and standards in the language arts and mathematics with strategies for how these specific standards may be met with appropriate teaching strategies.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course emphasizes the process of developing human potential in early childhood students by consciously applying principles of guidance, a process that is in keeping with the current emphasis on ""intentional teaching"" in the early childhood field. Those principles are based upon child development theory and research, as well as upon the knowledge, beliefs and values gained through many years of experience through work with young children and their families, with early childhood professionals, and with students preparing for careers with young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    In this course we have chosen to emphasize what we consider the key challenge for educators in the twenty-first century—responding to multiple perspectives in a changing world. By multiple perspectives we mean educators must consider, reflect, and respond to divergent ideas drawn from different disciplines of study, different points of view, different experiences, different contexts, and different voices. Students come to this course with perspectives of their own based on unique personal experiences, cultures, and communities. During this course, you will be exposed to other perspectives, values, cultures, and points of view. This course helps you analyze these divergent perspectives through academic disciplines including history, philosophy, politics, sociology, and the law. These new perspectives will interact with your own views and ultimately influence your role as a teacher. This process of analyzing and responding to differences does not end when you enter the teaching profession; different perspectives continue to emerge and your response to them changes as your own unique career path evolves. Multiple perspectives provide points of view that can enhance your own understanding of the changing world. By change we acknowledge the fast-paced world of information that influences you and your experiences. Your identity as a teacher emerges and evolves in response to this unending road of changes. The anchor that we provide in this sometimes chaotic and confusing world is the anchor of reflection and analysis. Throughout this course, we provide numerous opportunities to make sense of the changes in the world, to determine a reflective response to the present, and to adjust your response as new changes emerge. This course also presents a broad perspective of the changing world with a view to a global economy and global citizenship.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the biological, physical, perceptual, moral, and socioemotional nature of development in children from their prenatal beginnings through their early years. Learning objectives include developing an understanding about children’s care as well as exploring diversity, careers, and research in child development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Early childhood education is of concern to everyone who wants to live in an economically sound democracy. Although the early years have been traditionally the domain of early childhood professionals and parents, the rest of the society is beginning now to pay attention to what research has been telling us for a long time: “The first years last forever,” as the slogan goes. Early care and education isn’t just about preparing individuals for success in life, but also about giving them the kind of experiences that make them productive citizens of a democratic society. In quality early care and education programs, children not only gain the foundations they need for school success and beyond, but they also learn to interact with cooperative ways with others, the basis for gaining a sense of community. A good beginning in a high quality early care and education program can lead to both social and economic benefits and is a great investment for the society to make. It’s the kind of investment that will grow from generation to generation. Individuals reap the benefits of this investment and so does society.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an overview of teaching strategies from infants to the early elementary grades. It also covers the history and theories of teaching and learning, as well as how to implement these strategies in early childhood programs.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with current information for developing an integrated approach to curriculum and instruction in the early years of education. This course intends to bridge the worlds of child-care and early education, as well as those of preprimary and primary programs. In addition, it addresses early childhood education professionals-in-training and early childhood professionals working in formal group settings with young children from birth to age 8. The ideas in this course have been extensively field tested and found to be effective. All are designed to give students a cohesive view of the what, why, and how of developmentally appropriate practices. This course is valuable to both newcomers to the field and master practitioners.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of the Language Development course is to provide early childhood educators with a foundation of knowledge needed to develop classrooms and learning environments where language development is enhanced. This course is designed to examine effective instructional activities that are appropriate for the early childhood student’s learning and motivation. This course reviews language acquisition assessments used to determine the early childhood student’s level of progress and the effectiveness of each learning experience. Students review how to recognize the beginning of the early childhood student’s language development and communicative competencies through the critical nature of parent-infant interactions established through eye contact, shared reference, and turn-taking,.  Students analyze early attempts at writing by invented spelling, while reflecting on how to respond to the writing and provide learning activities that enhance the development of literacy. 

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on how literacy develops in young children and the ways in which early childhood teachers or early interventionists can encourage the natural emergence of early reading and writing. This course emphasizes on multicultural children's literature and introduces educators to a variety of multicultural children’s books. This course provides practical supports and strategies for early childhood educators, such as how to set up a literacy friendly environment, and it provides many suggestions for using classroom materials and centers to support literacy. This course also discusses in detail articles from various professionals in the field, and analyzes a variety of topics that affect the early childhood educator. This course offers an effective approach for teaching early literacy in preschool, and is applicable to most early childhood professionals.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is a practical guide to understanding and using a child-centered philosophy. The philosophy presented in this course is balanced, and child-centered. This course addresses the developmental needs and abilities of early childhood students and enables educators to implement high standards for behavior. The problem solving philosophy analyzed in this course emphasizes the early childhood student’s ability to solve their own problems when they are trusted and encouraged to do so. It contains the basic theoretical information needed to understand problem solving, yet its emphasis is on application, on working with groups of children in day care or preschool on a daily basis.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores creating and managing a developmentally appropriate early childhood classroom. Topics include young children's growth and development, long-term and short-term planning, room arrangements, center ideas, and scheduling and management.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the vital importance of play as a developmental tool, supporting all those who work in early childhood education and who care in developing and implementing the highest quality play experiences for young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course combines a child-centered philosophy with problem-solving strategies and a thorough discussion of diversity. This is an ideal introduction to curriculum and care for infants and toddlers. This course reviews the Ten Principles that are the underlying framework for early childhood education studies and reviews respectful techniques on the part of caregivers. In addition, this course emphasizes honoring diversity and infant-toddler exceptionalities while analyzing the latest research in brain development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a guide for thoughtful consideration of classroom and caregiver practices in preschool & school age settings. The two periods covered in this course are the prenatal period (9 months) and infancy and toddlerhood (birth to 2 years of age).

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course builds on the foundational principles presented in ECE 409 (Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Infant and Toddler Settings) with an introduction to early child development. The focuses of this course include appropriate assessment practices during these developmental years. The two periods covered in this course are the development of preschool children (early childhood) and children are of school age (middle childhood).

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed for individuals who are preparing to become early childhood educators. This course prepares students to measure or evaluate early childhood students and analyzes the differences between assessing this age range versus that of older students. This course includes discussion of assessment in the early childhood years written from a developmental perspective.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers observation techniques for assessing child development in the emotional, social, physical, cognitive, language, and creative areas of development.  Students learn methods and techniques for assessing child development supplemented with exercises and study of how to best apply an understanding of early cognition in order to develop a nurturing and beneficial educational setting for young children.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on early childhood education by examining theories related to development and learning and provides examples of methods and practices best implemented to ensure healthy, well-rounded development of children in the early childhood education setting. This course also presents current education legislation related to testing, assessment and curriculum development and the effect that this legislation has on the early childhood classroom. Students study nutrition, play and the importance of creativity in the classroom with a focus on practices designed to assist children with disabilities. This course examines cultural awareness in the classroom and how to be aware of multi-cultural issues in a diverse classroom. Students complete assignments to ensure comprehension of the material presented in the course as well as field activities in the classroom or with children in a variety of settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this individualized capstone experience is to enable students, to develop an original, comprehensive research project on a topic of professional or personal interest. This project-based course is designed to encourage students to draw upon knowledge and experience gained over the course of program. The project allows students the opportunity to integrate additional related educational or professional development activities. Projects are intended to be of applied and pragmatic nature, producing valuable research outcomes and findings either in connection with the student’s organizational situation, or in the exploration of entrepreneurial opportunities.

    3 Credits
    Required Books