Gain the skills needed to help protect the nation’s security.

Terrorism and homeland security experts have become a vital component of the criminal justice and public safety systems in the United States and are often called upon to act at the local, state, and national levels.

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice with a specialization in Terrorism and Homeland Security program provides the skills necessary to advance in your law enforcement-related careers or enter a more specialized field.

Enjoy Flexibility – 12 courses with start dates every 2 weeks
Choose Where You Learn – 100% online courses
Earn an Affordable Degree – Tuition and fees only $12,720
Pay Monthly – Opt to pay $325 per month
Focus On Your Passion – Choose your Capstone

This program presents a comprehensive criminal justice education that covers fundamental issues of criminal law, technology in law enforcement, and criminology. The Terrorism and Homeland Security specialization offers interrogation guidelines and patrol procedures, and training and on-field techniques.

You will acquire the tools to succeed in a variety of criminal justice-related careers through courses including Terrorism and Homeland Security; Interview and Interrogation; Patrol Procedures; and Use of Force in Law Enforcement.

Experts in this area of criminal justice are commonly utilized as part of local and state police forces or federal law enforcement agencies such as the Department of Homeland Security. Job duties may include organizing and enacting responses to emergency situations ranging from man-made threats to natural disasters.

Admission Requirements

  • Application – A completed application.
  • Bachelor’s Degree Transcripts – Official transcript demonstrating a conferred bachelor’s degree from an institution that is accredited by a CHEA recognized accrediting body or an international equivalent.
  • Military Documentation (Optional) – A copy of the most recent orders; or a copy of DD214 (This can be requested from the National Archives.)

Courses:

    This course examines the background and foundations of American criminal law, including United States Constitutional requirements, Federal and State court organization and jurisdiction, criminal law basics, and rules of evidence and procedure. Students study, in-depth, various categories of crimes and offenses, including assault, homicide, sex offenses, theft, arson, forgery, narcotics, extortion, traffic offenses, crimes affecting the judicial process and organized crime.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a clear and legally based exploration of the criminal procedure. It takes an in-depth look at conducting searches and what goes in to obtaining a search warrant, conducting plain view, open fields and consent searches and frisk searches. It covers all aspects of confessions, suspect identifications, and entrapment. This course concludes with pretrial matters and the trial and jury process.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course builds on the undergraduate course in this area. While the use of technology by police grows slowly due to Constitutional concerns, police must try to adapt emerging technologies into policing. The goal of this course is for future and current police leaders to understand the availability of technology and how to direct its use by subordinate officers.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores criminology and the factors that affect it including Supreme Court rulings, and governmental policies. This course examines the nature and causes of crime, and the effects of crime on issues of law, community, and law enforcement. Students will explore the nature, extent, and patterns of crime; victims and victimization; and theories of crime causation.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

     This course is designed to assist students in becoming more effective in professional as well as personal life through the development of human relations skills. Emphasizing different aspects of human relations, this course covers such topics as career advancement, developing good work habits, and managing stress and personal problems. This course is ideal for managerial, professional, and technical workers who want to improve workplace and personal relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The course prepares learners to plan and lead in emergency management incidents. For this course, all references to emergency management practices are based on those formed in the United States. Emergency management has evolved over the last two decades to encompass not only natural disasters, but also manmade calamities. Law enforcement leaders must quickly determine the scope and severity of disasters to ensure they can respond in ways that minimize danger to both the public and critical personnel responding to the event. The course discusses full-spectrum threat responses at the federal, state, and local levels to increase multi-level preparedness and integrated response.  Learners will earn new or validate existing FEMA training in emergency response.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course will provide students with an understanding of the American correctional system. It covers various topics including the history and law of corrections, punishment and rehabilitation of offenders, correctional practices ranging from probation to prison, and correctional trends. To begin, this course provides an overview of corrections, including the early history of correctional thought. Later, correctional law and the punishment of offenders will be examined, including the various types of correctional clients. Correctional practices including jails, probation, and intermediate sanctions and community corrections are explored. Corrections also covers incarceration, including the prison experience for men and women. This course reviews issues related to institutional management and programs; as well as once offenders are released from incarceration. This course explores supervision of offenders in the community, as well as corrections for juveniles. It also covers various trends including incarceration, race and ethnicity, and the death penalty. Finally, surveillance and control in the community are discussed, as well as community justice. The discussion will conclude with a look at the future of corrections.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Terrorism began receiving increased attention on university and college campuses as the number of American casualties grew from terrorist violence in the 1990s. This course introduces criminal justice and other social science students to the field of terrorism. It is designed to understand the world of terrorism and provide knowledge as a foundation for further understanding. Issues in terrorism are emotionally charged. This course is written for those who will counter terrorism with the purpose to explain many points of view without taking sides. This is true whether examining issues like the Israeli-Palestinian conflict or the controversy surrounding the USA Patriot Act.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Understanding the police use of force focuses on the extraordinary and rare event that develops when physical force is used by the police. Whenever police officers come into contact with citizens, there is always a chance that the encounter will digress to one in which force is used on a suspect. Fortunately, most police activities do not result in the use of forced, but those that do take on an interesting pattern of interaction between the officer and the citizen. This course tackles the research and summaries of a close statistical look into the use of force in law enforcement.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an understanding of police field operations from a leadership perspective. It covers various topics including community policing, communications, field procedures, traffic direction and enforcement, preliminary investigations, interviewing, arrest, search, custody, and use of force, reporting and records, and stress in the workplace.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Of all the topics taught in law enforcement academies and criminal justice training centers throughout the United States, one of the critical topics that always seem to get poor, little or even no attention at all is a course on the principles of interview and interrogation. For that reason, this University is offering Kinesic Interviewing to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques needed for interviewing and interrogation. It is vital to any case that investigators obtain essential information from victims, witnesses, informants, and confessions from suspects in such a way as to stand up to court scrutiny.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The capstone project allows students to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in their courses to the work environment. This project is completely individualized; students are encouraged to select work-related projects that are of particular interest to them and that will result in professional growth and benefit the organization.

    3 Credits