Gain advanced evidence collection and documentation techniques with a leader in criminal justice education.

Law enforcement management is an important element of the criminal justice system.

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice with a specialization in Law Enforcement Management program aims to provide the skills necessary to work in specialized areas of law enforcement and criminal justice. Law enforcement management training may lead to an array of leadership positions overseeing the operations of police and law enforcement agencies including chief of police, supervising manager, and similar management roles.

Enjoy Flexibility – 12 courses with start dates every 2 weeks
Choose Where You Learn – 100% online courses
Earn an Affordable Degree – Tuition and fees only $12,720
Pay Monthly – Opt to pay $325 per month
Focus On Your Passion – Choose your Capstone

We provide students with a comprehensive criminal justice education covering fundamental issues of criminal law, technology in law enforcement, and criminology. The Law Enforcement Management specialization familiarizes students with concepts crucial to effective police administration and supervision.

Professionals working in this field often take on lead administrative roles tasked with ensuring that police forces and similar organizations operate effectively at all levels to best serve their community.

Aspen University students acquire the tools to succeed in a variety of criminal justice-related careers through courses including Crime Scene Investigation, Technology in Law Enforcement, Fingerprinting, Criminal Procedure, and Criminal Law.

 

Admission Requirements

  • Application – A completed application.
  • Bachelor’s Degree Transcripts – Official transcript demonstrating a conferred bachelor’s degree from an institution that is accredited by a CHEA recognized accrediting body or an international equivalent.
  • Military Documentation (Optional) – A copy of the most recent orders; or a copy of DD214 (This can be requested from the National Archives.)

Courses:

    This course examines the background and foundations of American criminal law, including United States Constitutional requirements, Federal and State court organization and jurisdiction, criminal law basics, and rules of evidence and procedure. Students study, in-depth, various categories of crimes and offenses, including assault, homicide, sex offenses, theft, arson, forgery, narcotics, extortion, traffic offenses, crimes affecting the judicial process and organized crime.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a clear and legally based exploration of the criminal procedure. It takes an in-depth look at conducting searches and what goes in to obtaining a search warrant, conducting plain view, open fields and consent searches and frisk searches. It covers all aspects of confessions, suspect identifications, and entrapment. This course concludes with pretrial matters and the trial and jury process.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course builds on the undergraduate course in this area. While the use of technology by police grows slowly due to Constitutional concerns, police must try to adapt emerging technologies into policing. The goal of this course is for future and current police leaders to understand the availability of technology and how to direct its use by subordinate officers.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores criminology and the factors that affect it including Supreme Court rulings, and governmental policies. This course examines the nature and causes of crime, and the effects of crime on issues of law, community, and law enforcement. Students will explore the nature, extent, and patterns of crime; victims and victimization; and theories of crime causation.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

     This course is designed to assist students in becoming more effective in professional as well as personal life through the development of human relations skills. Emphasizing different aspects of human relations, this course covers such topics as career advancement, developing good work habits, and managing stress and personal problems. This course is ideal for managerial, professional, and technical workers who want to improve workplace and personal relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Thousands of police officers across the country routinely come face to face with domestic violence. With little direction they face the challenges that researchers and academics ponder. Rarely are they part of the intellectual discourse on abuse and neglect; however, this course is focused on that goal. This course is meant to tear down myths about both victims and offenders. Women and men have been victimized. Elderly and children are present as both perpetrators and victims as well. Heterosexuals and homosexuals can both be violent; dating relationships can be dangerous. To leave anyone out is to ignore the pain and suffering that domestic violence brings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course will provide students with an understanding of the American correctional system. It covers various topics including the history and law of corrections, punishment and rehabilitation of offenders, correctional practices ranging from probation to prison, and correctional trends. To begin, this course provides an overview of corrections, including the early history of correctional thought. Later, correctional law and the punishment of offenders will be examined, including the various types of correctional clients. Correctional practices including jails, probation, and intermediate sanctions and community corrections are explored. Corrections also covers incarceration, including the prison experience for men and women. This course reviews issues related to institutional management and programs; as well as once offenders are released from incarceration. This course explores supervision of offenders in the community, as well as corrections for juveniles. It also covers various trends including incarceration, race and ethnicity, and the death penalty. Finally, surveillance and control in the community are discussed, as well as community justice. The discussion will conclude with a look at the future of corrections.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the behavioral and functional aspects of police management, and issues associated with modern law enforcement. Students study leadership styles, the organizational environment, workforce development, management planning, problem identification, management by objectives, productivity, and fiscal management. Additionally, there is focus on special issues such as the use of power and force, civil liability, accreditation, ethics, establishing a police presence in schools, and the use of an assessment center for identifying promotion candidates.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Understanding the police use of force focuses on the extraordinary and rare event that develops when physical force is used by the police. Whenever police officers come into contact with citizens, there is always a chance that the encounter will digress to one in which force is used on a suspect. Fortunately, most police activities do not result in the use of forced, but those that do take on an interesting pattern of interaction between the officer and the citizen. This course tackles the research and summaries of a close statistical look into the use of force in law enforcement.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Police administrators do not have any easy job. Society wants the police to fight crime, but is not sure how they want the police to go about doing this effectively. The basic duty of the police administrator is the reduce crime while still holding on to democratic ideals and values in an increasingly diverse culture.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The course is about language evidence, not the more commonly known physical evidence such as DNA, fingerprints, or hair and fiber analysis. The areas of linguistics and communications have provided a powerful framework for law enforcement; there is no field of study that is broader or has more relationships with the rest of human existence since language is involved in virtually all of human activity. In much of life, the ability to make a good impression can be very useful. Unfortunately, there are also ways that some people can use language to create the impression that our words mean something that we really didn't intend. This course is focused toward forensic linguists, discourse analysts, criminologists, defense attorneys, prosecutors, and judges. It is the major intention of this course to show how powerful conversational strategies are used by law enforcement.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The capstone project allows students to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in their courses to the work environment. This project is completely individualized; students are encouraged to select work-related projects that are of particular interest to them and that will result in professional growth and benefit the organization.

    3 Credits