Prepare for a career in addiction counseling in under 3 years.

The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Addiction Counseling is a degree designed to help prepare students for careers in addiction counseling. Graduate with a solid understanding of the essential concepts of psychology, sociology, and counseling theory needed for a career in the field of addiction counseling. This program alone does not prepare students to become a licensed counselor nor does it fulfill state licensure requirements.

Enjoy Flexibility – 40 courses with start dates every 2 weeks
Learn from Anywhere – 100% online
Earn an Affordable Degree – Tuition and fees only $20,000
Pay Monthly – Opt to pay $250 per month

This program is structured around courses that address fundamental aspects of individual and family counseling, healthcare ethics, and addiction-specific topics related to the assessment, treatment, and prevention of substance abuse.  

The program also offers electives to fit your interests. Art, Spanish language, History, and other electives provide a well-rounded education.

Admission Requirements

  • Application – A completed application.
  • High School Transcripts – An official high school transcript or its equivalent. Waived if student has completed at least 15 credits of college-level course work.
  • Official Transcripts – Official transcripts for all previous college credit earned.
  • Minimum GPA Requirement – A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 is required for all previous high school or college credit.
  • Military Documentation (Optional) – A copy of the most recent orders; or a copy of DD214 (This can be requested from the National Archives.)
  • Transfer Credit Evaluation (Optional) – Students who have earned college credit may submit a transfer credit evaluation report with corresponding course descriptions, and official transcripts from accredited institutions in order to determine which credits may be applied toward the requirements of a program at Aspen University.
  • Conditional Acceptance – Students enrolling in an associates or bachelor’s degree program who have not previously earned college credit from an accredited institution will be Conditionally Accepted pending successful completion of Introduction to Communications. Upon successful completion of Introduction to Communications, students will receive an Unconditional Acceptance.

Courses:

    This course provides a study of human communication by covering major communication concepts, theories, research, and trends. This introduction communications course will help students to understand their own communication behavior as well the communication behavior of others. Concepts covered include basic theories of communication, understanding individual communication styles, the use of communication across cultures, and listening and critical thinking skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course offers the opportunity to learn about each child as an individual. It will demonstrate how working as a team will ensure a well-run purposeful program that meets the needs of each child and how to evaluate and manage the program at school. This course will also demonstrate how to develop a care giving partnership with each family and offers a variety of ways for families to be involved in the program. Methods of providing support to families will be discussed.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Concepts of Fundamental Mathematics will be a review of fundamental math concepts for some students and may break new ground for others. Students of all backgrounds will be delighted to find an approach that appeals to all learning styles and reaches out to diverse demographics. Through down-to-earth explanations, patient skill-building, and exceptionally interesting and realistic applications, this course will empower students to learn and master mathematics in the real world.  Textbook is offered free online & does not need to be purchased separately.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This statistics course is designed to prepare the nurse to understand statistical concepts and apply them to nursing issues, through analysis of data, statistics, and journal articles. Assignments are applied to nursing practice situations and patient care to move the student from the conceptual to the applied level of evidence-based practice. The student learns to describe issues and make inferences using statistics. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

    3 Credits

    This course provides comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, career planning, taxes, consumer credit, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection, insurance, investments, retirement planning, and estate planning. The goal is to teach the fundamentals of financial planning so students can make informed choices related to spending, saving, borrowing, and investing that lead to long-term financial security. Provided financial planning tools help identify and evaluate choices as well as understand the consequences of decisions in terms of opportunity costs.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course addresses methods for mental health professionals and educators to provide sources of support for students struggling with substance abuse, addiction, and compulsive behaviors. The focus is on the problems of substance abuse in high schools and colleges.  Recovery systems, including recovery high schools and college recovery communities, are covered by including material from adolescents and young adults impacted by these programs.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students master the traditional five-paragraph essay and variations of this essay. Four principles are presented as keys to effective writing: unity, support, coherence, and sentence skills. The first part of the course focuses on the first three principles and to some extent on sentence skills. It shows, respectively, how these four principles apply in the different patterns of essay development and in specialized types of writing.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Concepts of Fundamental Mathematics will be a review of fundamental math concepts for some students and may break new ground for others. Students of all backgrounds will be delighted to find an approach that appeals to all learning styles and reaches out to diverse demographics. Through down-to-earth explanations, patient skill-building, and exceptionally interesting and realistic applications, this course will empower students to learn and master mathematics in the real world.  Textbook is offered free online & does not need to be purchased separately.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This statistics course is designed to prepare the nurse to understand statistical concepts and apply them to nursing issues, through analysis of data, statistics, and journal articles. Assignments are applied to nursing practice situations and patient care to move the student from the conceptual to the applied level of evidence-based practice. The student learns to describe issues and make inferences using statistics. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

    3 Credits

    This course provides comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, career planning, taxes, consumer credit, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection, insurance, investments, retirement planning, and estate planning. The goal is to teach the fundamentals of financial planning so students can make informed choices related to spending, saving, borrowing, and investing that lead to long-term financial security. Provided financial planning tools help identify and evaluate choices as well as understand the consequences of decisions in terms of opportunity costs.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a broad exploration of eleven theories of counseling and psychotherapy.  The goal is to expose learners to the wide range of counseling options available to counselors.  Some may find themselves gravitating toward a specific theoretical construct.  Others may want to synthesize these theories into a unified concept of treatment. The textbook addresses each of the theories through a common organizational pattern where students can easily compare and contrast the models.  This pattern includes core topics such as key concepts, the therapeutic process, therapeutic techniques and procedures, multicultural perspective, and a summary of each theory.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Designed for the administrators, management, researchers, addiction counselors, and other professionals working in the medical field, this course uses a consistent and logical system to help students build their understanding of medical terminology. It also has a real-world focus that relates medical terminology to various health professions including addiction counseling, thereby capturing the students' interest and providing information about many different potential health careers.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the basic components of the human body and how it functions on a cellular level to organismal level.  The fundamentals of chemistry, biochemistry and cell biology will be presented along with the skeletal, muscular, nervous and integumentary systems.   Structure, function, and integration of these systems in health and disease will also be discussed.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO201, which is the complementary didactic course.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the systems of the human body including the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, immune, urinary and reproductive systems. Fundamentals of fluid and electrolyte balance, cellular communication, human nutrition and gene inheritance will also be presented. The structure, function, and integration of these systems in both health and disease will be discussed. This course is a continuation of BIO201. 

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such. This course is a continuation of BIO201L.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO202, which is the complementary didactic course.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis or microbial anatomy, microbial disease, and disease prevention.  The course includes a broad overview of both the historical and current  field of microbiology with focus on microbial pathogenicity, the spread of microbial pathogens, the methods of human immunity, and best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of microbial disease.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Since the discovery of inheritance, the field of Genetics has greatly increased our understanding of human diversity, health, and the transmission of disease.  In this course, the student will examine the molecular mechanisms of inheritance, extensively survey the contribution of genetics to disease, and review the current contributions of genetics to the treatment of disease. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

    3 Credits

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    In this course we focus on grammar, sentence structure, and other aspects of the "mechanics" of English. Our emphasis is on creating arguments that persuade, convince, and inspire. The goal of this course is to develop writing skills that enable students to develop powerful arguments that are more than just correct; they produce the results intended. We identify the fixed types of questions that an argument can address, helping students to build writing projects around the need to develop answers to significant questions concerning facts, definitions, causes, values, and actions. These questions form a logical progression - questions of fact and definition must be settled before questions of cause can be addressed, and so on - which means that they can serve as the basis of a sequence of assignments.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Health psychology is an important aspect to consider when addressing issue of substance abuse. This course explores health issues with a broad focus on  impact to persons, families, and friends. Methods for reducing adverse health outcomes are addressed as a potential for dual treatment planning. Stress, pain, weight, and exercise can all play important roles in behavior. Additionally, family history  is an important component to psychological  complications that may lead to abuse of substances.  Feelings that one is destined to be overweight, susceptible to illness, or generational substance abusers can reduce motivation to abstain from destructive behaviors.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course offers the opportunity to learn about each child as an individual. It will demonstrate how working as a team will ensure a well-run purposeful program that meets the needs of each child and how to evaluate and manage the program at school. This course will also demonstrate how to develop a care giving partnership with each family and offers a variety of ways for families to be involved in the program. Methods of providing support to families will be discussed.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course brings multicultural addiction counseling and therapy through micro-counseling - a practice that integrated multi-cultural concerns as far back as 1974. Concepts of observing, questioning, reflecting feelings, empathic self-disclosure, and empathic confrontation allow counselors to seek understanding of clients' situation and challenges. Crisis counseling and assessing suicide potential are also covered to ensure counselors can detect those in extreme distress.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course offers the opportunity to learn about each child as an individual. It will demonstrate how working as a team will ensure a well-run purposeful program that meets the needs of each child and how to evaluate and manage the program at school. This course will also demonstrate how to develop a care giving partnership with each family and offers a variety of ways for families to be involved in the program. Methods of providing support to families will be discussed.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course offers the opportunity to learn about each child as an individual. It will demonstrate how working as a team will ensure a well-run purposeful program that meets the needs of each child and how to evaluate and manage the program at school. This course will also demonstrate how to develop a care giving partnership with each family and offers a variety of ways for families to be involved in the program. Methods of providing support to families will be discussed.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the biological, physical, perceptual, moral, and socioemotional nature of development in children from their prenatal beginnings through their early years. Learning objectives include developing an understanding about children’s care as well as exploring diversity, careers, and research in child development.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an overview of counseling skills for the addictions counselor. It presents a state-of-the-art framework for assessment and treatment according to the DSM 5. The class discusses evidenced-based treatment models including client-centered foundation to treatment, cognitive-behavioral, 12-step, motivational, pharmacological, and family approaches. The course is designed to help students learn the clinical skills needed to become addictions counselors or social workers, and address resistance, co-occurring disorders, spirituality, coping and prevention in the context of theory and application to diverse populations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers psychometric and statistical concepts; new and revised tests, inventories, and scales; relevant ethical and legal issues; contemporary measurement theories; and important multicultural issues. In addition, the modules of this course provide guidance on how and when to use tests in different settings with different populations and information on basic procedures like test selection, administration, and reporting. Additional case studies have also been used to help students understand how to work with assessments and assessment results in real world addiction counseling situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course offers an in-depth examination of the addiction counseling profession. The modules approach each professional issue in addiction counseling from both an ethical and a legal point of view, offering students a complete, integrated exploration of all facets. Difficult issues are addressed in a straightforward manner that highlights typical situations and dilemmas followed by practical, realistic advice.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

    3 Credits

    We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

    3 Credits

    This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course offers the opportunity to learn about each child as an individual. It will demonstrate how working as a team will ensure a well-run purposeful program that meets the needs of each child and how to evaluate and manage the program at school. This course will also demonstrate how to develop a care giving partnership with each family and offers a variety of ways for families to be involved in the program. Methods of providing support to families will be discussed.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the basic components of the human body and how it functions on a cellular level to organismal level.  The fundamentals of chemistry, biochemistry and cell biology will be presented along with the skeletal, muscular, nervous and integumentary systems.   Structure, function, and integration of these systems in health and disease will also be discussed.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO201, which is the complementary didactic course.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the systems of the human body including the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, immune, urinary and reproductive systems. Fundamentals of fluid and electrolyte balance, cellular communication, human nutrition and gene inheritance will also be presented. The structure, function, and integration of these systems in both health and disease will be discussed. This course is a continuation of BIO201. 

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such. This course is a continuation of BIO201L.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO202, which is the complementary didactic course.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis or microbial anatomy, microbial disease, and disease prevention.  The course includes a broad overview of both the historical and current  field of microbiology with focus on microbial pathogenicity, the spread of microbial pathogens, the methods of human immunity, and best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of microbial disease.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Since the discovery of inheritance, the field of Genetics has greatly increased our understanding of human diversity, health, and the transmission of disease.  In this course, the student will examine the molecular mechanisms of inheritance, extensively survey the contribution of genetics to disease, and review the current contributions of genetics to the treatment of disease. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

    3 Credits

    This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Psychology of Addiction Counseling explores the techniques and skills a new practitioner will need in the real world, while providing a thorough review of the theory, history, and research of addiction counseling. This course offers prospective counselors the tools and strategies they will need for working with general and special populations, including assessment tools, strategies for outpatient and inpatient treatment, information about maintenance and relapse prevention, and counseling strategies for couples, families, children and adolescents, and recovering addicts.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course covers the specific addictions of substance abuse, focusing on counseling fundamentals and proven techniques. The course also focuses on the most prevalent substances abused, along with physical reactions in the human body. The setting and planning of individual, group, and family treatment is covered in depth.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course presents items unique to counseling children and understanding different drivers concerning juvenile addiction psychology. The material covered takes a multidimensional four-part approach to counseling children. This approach: 1) capitalizes on the relationships children build with parents, teachers, and other adults; 2) looks at children's developmental processes; 3) examines multicultural influences upon them; and 4) takes into consideration the variety of intervention models available. The course examines four major approaches to child therapy: psychodynamic, child-centered, behavioral/cognitive-behavioral, and family systems. The course brings everything together through a case study that shows the multidimensional approach in action.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid overview of the juvenile justice system in the United States. It presents the historical background of the U.S. juvenile justice system, its current status, as well as contemporary societal and legal debates. An examination of various policies, programs, and practices is provided throughout the text. The course includes coverage of juvenile law and procedure, juvenile corrections, juvenile delinquency, delinquency prevention, and the future of juvenile justice in the United States. This knowledge will serve you well as a strong foundation for other more specialized courses in juvenile justice and the social sciences. The need for post-secondary juvenile justice education becomes more evident every day as the law changes and new forms of crime emerge to befuddle the best efforts of those charged with dealing with crime.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Within the context of addiction related concerns but also focusing on broader issues that a counselor may face, this course covers vital information concerning crisis intervention and prevention. The course covers assessing and reacting to crises involving suicide, homicide, intimate partner violence, sexual assault and abuse, bereavement and grief, substance abuse, natural disaster, war, and terrorism. The course also focuses on practical applications, assessment, and treatment options for each crisis. Taking the needs of modern-day counselors into mind, this class not only addresses traditional conceptualizations of crisis but also expands to cover recent developments in the concept of crisis in today’s world, such as terrorism, school shootings, and natural disasters. The course allows students to become familiar with various crisis issues and situations and practice necessary skills before encountering the problem for the first time in the field. The class features numerous crisis situations and analyzes these situations keeping in mind specialized fields such as school counseling, mental health counseling, and pastoral counseling. Students are asked to see the process as a whole and are exposed to crucial information, clinical considerations, and practical experiences on each crisis topic. Prerequisite: All Required Liberal Arts and 100/200-Level

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Throughout this course, students will learn about the profession of social work, social work perspectives, generalist social work, addiction counseling and social work crossovers, and contemporary issues in fields of practice. The course is designed to give students a better understanding of who social workers are, what their roles are, and a view of the diverse population that social workers serve. In the course, students will learn the strengths and empowerment perspective to social work while examining values and ethics, cultural diversity, social justice and human rights, social work practice, human behavior, populations at risk, and policy and services.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    This course will teach students how to identify the signs of child abuse and neglect, as well as how to report cases for the best outcome for the child. Fundamental counseling approaches with regards to the needs of abused and neglected children will also be addressed. Methods of providing support to families of abused children will also be discussed.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Within the context of addiction counseling, this course explores the full range of contemporary issues in healthcare ethics in a clear and concise way from a practical wisdom approach. The course presents the fundamental concerns of modern medical ethics--autonomy, beneficence, justice, and confidentiality--and then provides analysis, cases, and insights from the perspective of addiction related topics. Throughout, the discussion starts with larger issues or concepts and principles and then focuses on specific problems or complications with a focus on real world application and counseling techniques.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    Within an addiction-counseling context, this course introduces students to the theory and research findings needed to understand how to make groups effective and to build the skills required to apply that knowledge in practical situations. The class illustrates how this knowledge and mastery of skills creates choices, opportunities, and successes for each individual.

    3 Credits
    Required Books

    The purpose of this individualized learning experience is to enable you, as an Aspen student well along the way toward the completion of your degree requirements, to develop an original comprehensive research project on a topic of professional or personal interest. This project-based course is designed to encourage you to draw upon knowledge and experience that you have gained over the course of your studies with Aspen. The project also allows you to integrate your other related educational or professional development activities. Projects are intended to be of an applied and pragmatic nature and we hope that the outcome and findings of your research will be of value to you, either in connection with your own organizational situation, or personally such as in the exploration of entrepreneurial opportunities.

    3 Credits