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Put yourself in a position to excel and advance with an affordable online Criminal Justice degree.


The University is not accepting new applications for this program at this time.

Criminal justice is a significant career in any nation in the world. The profession is vital to police officers who have the role of protecting citizens and serving society every day.

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice is designed to provide you with a specialized education that can offer increased opportunity and room for advancement in criminal justice and law enforcement careers.

Enjoy Flexibility – 40 courses with start dates every 2 weeks
Choose Where You Learn – 100% online courses
Affordable Monthly Payments – Opt to pay $250 per month
Focus On Your Passion – Choose your Capstone

Gain skills that will help you think strategically, manage time and react confidently as an expert and professional in your field.

This program provides a comprehensive education that includes a core liberal arts curriculum and the training essential for careers in law enforcement, criminal investigation, and the management and administration of such operations. Grow the skills needed to successfully pursue careers in a variety of environments including courts, corrections, parole and probation systems, and law enforcement.

The curriculum combines core liberal arts courses in areas such as history and psychology, with criminal justice-specific courses including Technology in Criminal Justice and Ethics in Law Enforcement. You will take practical courses that focus on how society handles crime through its legal and law-enforcement systems.

Tailor your studies to fit your educational and professional goals by choosing to enroll in specialized courses addressing topics such as police supervision, organized crime investigation, terrorism investigation, and juvenile justice, among others.

Admission Requirements

  • Application – A completed application.
  • High School Transcripts – An official high school transcript or its equivalent. Waived if student has completed at least 15 credits of college-level course work.
  • Official Transcripts – Official transcripts for all previous college credit earned.
  • Minimum GPA Requirement – A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 is required for all previous high school or college credit.
  • Military Documentation (Optional) – A copy of the most recent orders; or a copy of DD214 (This can be requested from the National Archives.)
  • Transfer Credit Evaluation (Optional) – Students who have earned college credit may submit a transfer credit evaluation report with corresponding course descriptions, and official transcripts from accredited institutions in order to determine which credits may be applied toward the requirements of a program at Aspen University.
  • Conditional Acceptance – Students enrolling in an associates or bachelor’s degree program who have not previously earned college credit from an accredited institution will be Conditionally Accepted pending successful completion of Introduction to Communications. Upon successful completion of Introduction to Communications, students will receive an Unconditional Acceptance.

Criminal Justice Administration

This course provides a study of human communication by covering major communication concepts, theories, research, and trends. This introduction communications course will help students to understand their own communication behavior as well the communication behavior of others. Concepts covered include basic theories of communication, understanding individual communication styles, the use of communication across cultures, and listening and critical thinking skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, career planning, taxes, consumer credit, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection, insurance, investments, retirement planning, and estate planning. The goal is to teach the fundamentals of financial planning so students can make informed choices related to spending, saving, borrowing, and investing that lead to long-term financial security. Provided financial planning tools help identify and evaluate choices as well as understand the consequences of decisions in terms of opportunity costs.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This statistics course is designed to prepare the nurse to understand statistical concepts and apply them to nursing issues, through analysis of data, statistics, and journal articles. Assignments are applied to nursing practice situations and patient care to move the student from the conceptual to the applied level of evidence-based practice. The student learns to describe issues and make inferences using statistics. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

3 Credits

Concepts of Fundamental Mathematics will be a review of fundamental math concepts for some students and may break new ground for others. Students of all backgrounds will be delighted to find an approach that appeals to all learning styles and reaches out to diverse demographics. Through down-to-earth explanations, patient skill-building, and exceptionally interesting and realistic applications, this course will empower students to learn and master mathematics in the real world.  Textbook is offered free online & does not need to be purchased separately.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed for understanding the policing of America. This course reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this course as well as what the police are doing to prevent, and react to, any future attacks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students master the traditional five-paragraph essay and variations of this essay. Four principles are presented as keys to effective writing: unity, support, coherence, and sentence skills. The first part of the course focuses on the first three principles and to some extent on sentence skills. It shows, respectively, how these four principles apply in the different patterns of essay development and in specialized types of writing.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the systems of the human body including the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, immune, urinary and reproductive systems. Fundamentals of fluid and electrolyte balance, cellular communication, human nutrition and gene inheritance will also be presented. The structure, function, and integration of these systems in both health and disease will be discussed. This course is a continuation of BIO201. 

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such. This course is a continuation of BIO201L.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO202, which is the complementary didactic course.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis or microbial anatomy, microbial disease, and disease prevention.  The course includes a broad overview of both the historical and current  field of microbiology with focus on microbial pathogenicity, the spread of microbial pathogens, the methods of human immunity, and best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of microbial disease.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the basic components of the human body and how it functions on a cellular level to organismal level.  The fundamentals of chemistry, biochemistry and cell biology will be presented along with the skeletal, muscular, nervous and integumentary systems.   Structure, function, and integration of these systems in health and disease will also be discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO201, which is the complementary didactic course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Since the discovery of inheritance, the field of Genetics has greatly increased our understanding of human diversity, health, and the transmission of disease.  In this course, the student will examine the molecular mechanisms of inheritance, extensively survey the contribution of genetics to disease, and review the current contributions of genetics to the treatment of disease. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

3 Credits

This course provides comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, career planning, taxes, consumer credit, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection, insurance, investments, retirement planning, and estate planning. The goal is to teach the fundamentals of financial planning so students can make informed choices related to spending, saving, borrowing, and investing that lead to long-term financial security. Provided financial planning tools help identify and evaluate choices as well as understand the consequences of decisions in terms of opportunity costs.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This statistics course is designed to prepare the nurse to understand statistical concepts and apply them to nursing issues, through analysis of data, statistics, and journal articles. Assignments are applied to nursing practice situations and patient care to move the student from the conceptual to the applied level of evidence-based practice. The student learns to describe issues and make inferences using statistics. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

3 Credits

Concepts of Fundamental Mathematics will be a review of fundamental math concepts for some students and may break new ground for others. Students of all backgrounds will be delighted to find an approach that appeals to all learning styles and reaches out to diverse demographics. Through down-to-earth explanations, patient skill-building, and exceptionally interesting and realistic applications, this course will empower students to learn and master mathematics in the real world.  Textbook is offered free online & does not need to be purchased separately.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the justice administration system, encompassing police, courts, and corrections management. These three institutions must work together to achieve an effective overall system for the protection of public safety and order, the impartial and fair trial of those accused of crime, and the enlightened confinement and rehabilitation of those found guilty to minimize the rate of recidivism.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores ethical standards and codes in criminal justice professions. Students will study cases to illustrate ethical issues, and derive solutions to ethical dilemmas using critical thinking. The student will be given a critical perspective of how constituent parts interrelate in a framework of questions about moral and ethical conduct.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the systems of the human body including the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, immune, urinary and reproductive systems. Fundamentals of fluid and electrolyte balance, cellular communication, human nutrition and gene inheritance will also be presented. The structure, function, and integration of these systems in both health and disease will be discussed. This course is a continuation of BIO201. 

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such. This course is a continuation of BIO201L.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO202, which is the complementary didactic course.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis or microbial anatomy, microbial disease, and disease prevention.  The course includes a broad overview of both the historical and current  field of microbiology with focus on microbial pathogenicity, the spread of microbial pathogens, the methods of human immunity, and best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of microbial disease.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the basic components of the human body and how it functions on a cellular level to organismal level.  The fundamentals of chemistry, biochemistry and cell biology will be presented along with the skeletal, muscular, nervous and integumentary systems.   Structure, function, and integration of these systems in health and disease will also be discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO201, which is the complementary didactic course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Since the discovery of inheritance, the field of Genetics has greatly increased our understanding of human diversity, health, and the transmission of disease.  In this course, the student will examine the molecular mechanisms of inheritance, extensively survey the contribution of genetics to disease, and review the current contributions of genetics to the treatment of disease. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

3 Credits

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

In this course we focus on grammar, sentence structure, and other aspects of the "mechanics" of English. Our emphasis is on creating arguments that persuade, convince, and inspire. The goal of this course is to develop writing skills that enable students to develop powerful arguments that are more than just correct; they produce the results intended. We identify the fixed types of questions that an argument can address, helping students to build writing projects around the need to develop answers to significant questions concerning facts, definitions, causes, values, and actions. These questions form a logical progression - questions of fact and definition must be settled before questions of cause can be addressed, and so on - which means that they can serve as the basis of a sequence of assignments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed for understanding the policing of America. This course reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this course as well as what the police are doing to prevent, and react to, any future attacks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

The investigation of clandestine labs is one of the most challenging of law enforcement. Traditional investigative techniques are used to develop information concerning the location of the lab and the identity of the operator. No other law enforcement activity relies on forensic experts as heavily as does the investigation of clandestine labs. This course explores the many people involved in identifying the clandestine lab, the proper collection and preservation of the physical evidence followed by the complete analysis of the evidentiary samples. It reveals how the information gathered is the cornerstone on which the forensic expert's opinion is based and if it is handled properly, the Court will have all the information it needs to make a fully informed decision.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces the student to the dynamic field of criminology that changes constantly with each release of major research studies, Supreme Court rulings, and governmental policy, not to mention the current events of everyday life. Criminologists spend their career trying to understand what drives people to commit crime. This introductory course will provide insights into the answers, and will help students to think critically about law and justice. At the end of this course, students should have developed a critical perspective toward the social and legal institutions entrusted with crime control.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a framework of information about technology and computers and specifically how they are used by criminals and law enforcement agencies. The course provides a classic book on police technology, suppemented with modern innovations. This allows a comparative approach to use of technology in policing, and recognition of the somewhat slow pace of approval to use new technologies against citizens.  It examines basic computer concepts and design, networking and information exchange, and then delves into more advanced and crime-specific technologies such as wiretaps, surveillance, and the use of technology in high-tech crimes, disaster response, and police protection. The study of technology is integrated into wider criminal justice themes: ethical and legal implications of technology; technology's place in the community based policing model; and, how technology impacts traditional criminal justice theories.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed for understanding the policing of America. This course reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this course as well as what the police are doing to prevent, and react to, any future attacks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

The investigation of clandestine labs is one of the most challenging of law enforcement. Traditional investigative techniques are used to develop information concerning the location of the lab and the identity of the operator. No other law enforcement activity relies on forensic experts as heavily as does the investigation of clandestine labs. This course explores the many people involved in identifying the clandestine lab, the proper collection and preservation of the physical evidence followed by the complete analysis of the evidentiary samples. It reveals how the information gathered is the cornerstone on which the forensic expert's opinion is based and if it is handled properly, the Court will have all the information it needs to make a fully informed decision.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces the student to the dynamic field of criminology that changes constantly with each release of major research studies, Supreme Court rulings, and governmental policy, not to mention the current events of everyday life. Criminologists spend their career trying to understand what drives people to commit crime. This introductory course will provide insights into the answers, and will help students to think critically about law and justice. At the end of this course, students should have developed a critical perspective toward the social and legal institutions entrusted with crime control.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a framework of information about technology and computers and specifically how they are used by criminals and law enforcement agencies. The course provides a classic book on police technology, suppemented with modern innovations. This allows a comparative approach to use of technology in policing, and recognition of the somewhat slow pace of approval to use new technologies against citizens.  It examines basic computer concepts and design, networking and information exchange, and then delves into more advanced and crime-specific technologies such as wiretaps, surveillance, and the use of technology in high-tech crimes, disaster response, and police protection. The study of technology is integrated into wider criminal justice themes: ethical and legal implications of technology; technology's place in the community based policing model; and, how technology impacts traditional criminal justice theories.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed for understanding the policing of America. This course reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this course as well as what the police are doing to prevent, and react to, any future attacks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

The investigation of clandestine labs is one of the most challenging of law enforcement. Traditional investigative techniques are used to develop information concerning the location of the lab and the identity of the operator. No other law enforcement activity relies on forensic experts as heavily as does the investigation of clandestine labs. This course explores the many people involved in identifying the clandestine lab, the proper collection and preservation of the physical evidence followed by the complete analysis of the evidentiary samples. It reveals how the information gathered is the cornerstone on which the forensic expert's opinion is based and if it is handled properly, the Court will have all the information it needs to make a fully informed decision.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces the student to the dynamic field of criminology that changes constantly with each release of major research studies, Supreme Court rulings, and governmental policy, not to mention the current events of everyday life. Criminologists spend their career trying to understand what drives people to commit crime. This introductory course will provide insights into the answers, and will help students to think critically about law and justice. At the end of this course, students should have developed a critical perspective toward the social and legal institutions entrusted with crime control.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a framework of information about technology and computers and specifically how they are used by criminals and law enforcement agencies. The course provides a classic book on police technology, suppemented with modern innovations. This allows a comparative approach to use of technology in policing, and recognition of the somewhat slow pace of approval to use new technologies against citizens.  It examines basic computer concepts and design, networking and information exchange, and then delves into more advanced and crime-specific technologies such as wiretaps, surveillance, and the use of technology in high-tech crimes, disaster response, and police protection. The study of technology is integrated into wider criminal justice themes: ethical and legal implications of technology; technology's place in the community based policing model; and, how technology impacts traditional criminal justice theories.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed for understanding the policing of America. This course reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this course as well as what the police are doing to prevent, and react to, any future attacks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

The investigation of clandestine labs is one of the most challenging of law enforcement. Traditional investigative techniques are used to develop information concerning the location of the lab and the identity of the operator. No other law enforcement activity relies on forensic experts as heavily as does the investigation of clandestine labs. This course explores the many people involved in identifying the clandestine lab, the proper collection and preservation of the physical evidence followed by the complete analysis of the evidentiary samples. It reveals how the information gathered is the cornerstone on which the forensic expert's opinion is based and if it is handled properly, the Court will have all the information it needs to make a fully informed decision.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces the student to the dynamic field of criminology that changes constantly with each release of major research studies, Supreme Court rulings, and governmental policy, not to mention the current events of everyday life. Criminologists spend their career trying to understand what drives people to commit crime. This introductory course will provide insights into the answers, and will help students to think critically about law and justice. At the end of this course, students should have developed a critical perspective toward the social and legal institutions entrusted with crime control.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a framework of information about technology and computers and specifically how they are used by criminals and law enforcement agencies. The course provides a classic book on police technology, suppemented with modern innovations. This allows a comparative approach to use of technology in policing, and recognition of the somewhat slow pace of approval to use new technologies against citizens.  It examines basic computer concepts and design, networking and information exchange, and then delves into more advanced and crime-specific technologies such as wiretaps, surveillance, and the use of technology in high-tech crimes, disaster response, and police protection. The study of technology is integrated into wider criminal justice themes: ethical and legal implications of technology; technology's place in the community based policing model; and, how technology impacts traditional criminal justice theories.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

Effective law enforcement requires a basic understanding of the fundamental laws of the land. This course provides the overview of legal guidelines and protections enshrined in the US Constitution, from which all American criminal law is derived. Students will explore the theory of governmental authority that underpins the Constitution, and the evolution of Constitutional rights as codified in the Constitutional amendments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

3 Credits
Required Books

Welcome to Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. The class will explore how crime is addressed and adjudicated in selected countries bearing varied cultural perspectives. It is important to understand the diversity of how human beings respond to acts of criminality within their culture. Through this form of comparative benchmarking the student will analyze and evaluate the United States’ criminal justice system with that of other cultures. Students will also critically examine contemporary issues shared across the studied countries and thoughtfully create their own recommendations to address those issues. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student should be able to: · Identify the varying levels of criminality across cultures and how that might shape criminal justice systems. · Articulate the value of comparing the application of various criminal justice systems and the utility of knowing the associated outcomes of those practices. · Evaluate the integrity of sources of international criminal justice statistics. · Understand the importance of the sources of various criminal justice systems to their formation. · Differentiate the methods used to address juvenile justice across the studied countries. · Assess the ramifications of being incarcerated in various countries. · Analyze alternative approaches to criminal justice in a manner that promotes consideration, and possibly synthesis, of these alternatives when confronted with issues of crime. · Understand the role terrorism plays in tactical and strategic planning of criminal justice activities. · Explore both the need for collaboration and limitations inherent to trans-border coordination to address transnational crime. · Evaluate the role of leaders in the criminal justice system by considering the many responsibilities accounted for when selecting appropriate courses of action. Expected Prerequisites in course sequence: CJ110 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ120 Introduction to Law Enforcement

3 Credits
Required Books

With all of the knowledge taught in law enforcement academies and criminal justice training centers throughout the United States, the principles of interviewing and interrogating suspects always seem to attract little or no attention. For that reason, this course on kinesic interviewing equips the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques needed for conducting effective interviews and interrogations. It is vital to any case that investigators obtain essential information from victims, witnesses, and informants, and confessions from suspects in such a way as to stand up to court scrutiny.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course builds on the foundations established in Constitutional Law I by taking the students through a series of legal case studies to gain an appreciation of how the legal system works in practice. The objective of these case studies is to provide the students with the insights that come from courtroom experience so that they are better prepared to find, collect, and handle evidence in a way that will facilitate criminal conviction.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed for understanding the code of criminal law that police officers must deal with as an integral part of their career. This course addresses the body of criminal law that affects police agencies and the criminal justice system. This course is divided into eight modules.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid overview of the juvenile justice system in the United States. It presents the historical background of the U.S. juvenile justice system, its current status, as well as contemporary societal and legal debates. An examination of various policies, programs, and practices is provided throughout the text. The course includes coverage of juvenile law and procedure, juvenile corrections, juvenile delinquency, delinquency prevention, and the future of juvenile justice in the United States. This knowledge will serve you well as a strong foundation for other more specialized courses in juvenile justice and the social sciences. The need for post-secondary juvenile justice education becomes more evident every day as the law changes and new forms of crime emerge to befuddle the best efforts of those charged with dealing with crime.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to be an introduction to a wide variety of issues that confront today's modern police manager. The complex nature of policing in modern society mandates a thorough understanding of such issues as organizational culture, leadership styles, transactional analysis, problem identification and decision making, management by objectives, productivity, fiscal management, civil liability, accreditation, and ethics, to name but a few. This course will explore these issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

Each year tens of thousands of Americans are killed or injured on our nation's roadways. Property damage and other direct and indirect costs of traffic collisions have become one of the most personally devastating and wasteful drains on our economy. For maximum effect, traffic supervision must be carefully planned; if planning is to be effective, it must be based on accurate and timely facts. The best traffic control schemes and techniques are learned primarily from research obtained from accident investigation. Traffic and patrol officers play a critical role in attempting to stem the tide of unnecessary death and destruction which can be attributed to traffic accidents. This course serves as a guide for traffic enforcement responsibility.  No textbook is required for this course.

3 Credits

This course explores what a modern police supervisor is and what that person should know and do, as well as when and how to do it. The course addresses the issue of role conflict that someone typically experiences when in the situation of having to meet the expectations of numerous sets of constituencies. This course will provide an understanding of the group behaviors and organizational dynamics necessary to understand the fundamentals of police administration.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of constitutional criminal procedure is the study of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and opinions. This course is designed primarily as a supplementary course for undergraduate and graduate students taking a criminal procedure course whose main interest consists of U.S. Supreme Court cases. Reading law cases-a daunting task even for first-year law students-is a significant intellectual challenge for non-law students, especially if the criminal procedure class is their first law course. This course provides a guide to the U.S. Supreme Court cases that students are likely to encounter in a criminal procedure course. The decisions are stated succinctly and with enough basic reasoning to grasp the direction of the decision-making process. There are many benefits to the case method approach in which students read original source material. Such benefits include gaining in-depth knowledge of the reasoning process by which constitutional rules are formulated, a sharpening of critical thinking skills through the analysis of the justices' written opinions, and improving students' reading comprehension levels and writing skills. 

3 Credits
Required Books

The role of a first responder is a special one. While the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system is comprised of a talented team of many individuals at different certification levels, the First Responder is the one who arrives on the scene of an emergency first. This is a unique responsibility, one for which specialized training is required. In addition to providing information about emergency care for the First Responder, this course will also discuss issues about staying safe while at the scene of an emergency.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed to understand and succeed in the field of private and public security. Introduction to Security is divided into eight Modules corresponding to three parts: 1) Introduction and Security's Function, 2) The Basics of Defense, and 3) Specific Threats and Solutions. In this interesting course, you will realize the drastic changes that have occurred in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon that have shaken the security industry-both private and governmental.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on one of the most revolutionary models of policing we have seen in many decades. Community policing is not merely a means of better addressing community needs, but a philosophy that turns traditional policing on its head by empowering the community rather than dictating to the community. In this way, policing derives its role and priorities from the community rather than dictating to the community what the police role will be. Community policing requires a new breed of police officers who must serve as more than law enforcers. Community Police Officers (CPOs) must also play the important roles of advisors, facilitators, and supporters of new community-based initiatives. The CPO has responsibility for a specific geographical area and works as a generalist who considers making arrests as only one of many options that can be use, if only temporarily, to address community problems. As the community's conduit for positive change, the COP enlists citizens in the process of policing themselves.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed for understanding the policing of America. This course reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this course as well as what the police are doing to prevent, and react to, any future attacks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

The investigation of clandestine labs is one of the most challenging of law enforcement. Traditional investigative techniques are used to develop information concerning the location of the lab and the identity of the operator. No other law enforcement activity relies on forensic experts as heavily as does the investigation of clandestine labs. This course explores the many people involved in identifying the clandestine lab, the proper collection and preservation of the physical evidence followed by the complete analysis of the evidentiary samples. It reveals how the information gathered is the cornerstone on which the forensic expert's opinion is based and if it is handled properly, the Court will have all the information it needs to make a fully informed decision.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces the student to the dynamic field of criminology that changes constantly with each release of major research studies, Supreme Court rulings, and governmental policy, not to mention the current events of everyday life. Criminologists spend their career trying to understand what drives people to commit crime. This introductory course will provide insights into the answers, and will help students to think critically about law and justice. At the end of this course, students should have developed a critical perspective toward the social and legal institutions entrusted with crime control.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a framework of information about technology and computers and specifically how they are used by criminals and law enforcement agencies. The course provides a classic book on police technology, suppemented with modern innovations. This allows a comparative approach to use of technology in policing, and recognition of the somewhat slow pace of approval to use new technologies against citizens.  It examines basic computer concepts and design, networking and information exchange, and then delves into more advanced and crime-specific technologies such as wiretaps, surveillance, and the use of technology in high-tech crimes, disaster response, and police protection. The study of technology is integrated into wider criminal justice themes: ethical and legal implications of technology; technology's place in the community based policing model; and, how technology impacts traditional criminal justice theories.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces students to the corrections system. The growing population of prisoners constitutes a management challenge for all law enforcement communities, and a potential source of governmental liability. This course discusses the historical development of corrections, and examines the goals of criminal sentencing, the management of jails and prisons, the concept of alternative sentencing, guidelines on prisoner rights, and issues associated with parole and probation.

3 Credits
Required Books

One of the guiding premises of this course is that the range of activities that can fall under the heading of white collar crime is more pervasive and more costly to society than are conventional crime and deviance. The study of white collar crime should obviously be of interest to students planning criminal justice careers and to people already employed in the criminal justice system. As the investigation and prosecution of white collar crime increases, career opportunities for individuals well informed about this type of activity should expand. The law in the white collar realm that confronts pre-law and law students is especially dynamic and complex. The problem of corporate liability poses special difficulties, and the subtle and sometimes arbitrary lines of demarcation between criminal law and civil law are crucial aspects of the study of white collar crime. The study of white collar crime is likely to be of interest to students of the social and behavioral sciences because white collar criminality, as it is defined here, often involves human behavior in its most devious and diabolical forms. Finally, as citizens, employees, employers, and professionals, most of us are likely to be affected more by white collar crime than by any other type of criminal activity. Prerequisite: All Required Liberal Arts and 100/200-Level Courses

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this individualized learning experience is to enable you, as an Aspen student well along the way toward the completion of your degree requirements, to develop an original comprehensive research project on a topic of professional or personal interest. This project-based course is designed to encourage you to draw upon knowledge and experience that you have gained over the course of your studies with Aspen. The project also allows you to integrate your other related educational or professional development activities. Projects are intended to be of an applied and pragmatic nature and we hope that the outcome and findings of your research will be of value to you, either in connection with your own organizational situation, or personally such as in the exploration of entrepreneurial opportunities.

3 Credits

Major Crime Investigation Procedure

This course provides a study of human communication by covering major communication concepts, theories, research, and trends. This introduction communications course will help students to understand their own communication behavior as well the communication behavior of others. Concepts covered include basic theories of communication, understanding individual communication styles, the use of communication across cultures, and listening and critical thinking skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, career planning, taxes, consumer credit, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection, insurance, investments, retirement planning, and estate planning. The goal is to teach the fundamentals of financial planning so students can make informed choices related to spending, saving, borrowing, and investing that lead to long-term financial security. Provided financial planning tools help identify and evaluate choices as well as understand the consequences of decisions in terms of opportunity costs.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This statistics course is designed to prepare the nurse to understand statistical concepts and apply them to nursing issues, through analysis of data, statistics, and journal articles. Assignments are applied to nursing practice situations and patient care to move the student from the conceptual to the applied level of evidence-based practice. The student learns to describe issues and make inferences using statistics. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

3 Credits

Concepts of Fundamental Mathematics will be a review of fundamental math concepts for some students and may break new ground for others. Students of all backgrounds will be delighted to find an approach that appeals to all learning styles and reaches out to diverse demographics. Through down-to-earth explanations, patient skill-building, and exceptionally interesting and realistic applications, this course will empower students to learn and master mathematics in the real world.  Textbook is offered free online & does not need to be purchased separately.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to be an introduction to a wide variety of issues that confront today's modern police manager. The complex nature of policing in modern society mandates a thorough understanding of such issues as organizational culture, leadership styles, transactional analysis, problem identification and decision making, management by objectives, productivity, fiscal management, civil liability, accreditation, and ethics, to name but a few. This course will explore these issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces students to the corrections system. The growing population of prisoners constitutes a management challenge for all law enforcement communities, and a potential source of governmental liability. This course discusses the historical development of corrections, and examines the goals of criminal sentencing, the management of jails and prisons, the concept of alternative sentencing, guidelines on prisoner rights, and issues associated with parole and probation.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on one of the most revolutionary models of policing we have seen in many decades. Community policing is not merely a means of better addressing community needs, but a philosophy that turns traditional policing on its head by empowering the community rather than dictating to the community. In this way, policing derives its role and priorities from the community rather than dictating to the community what the police role will be. Community policing requires a new breed of police officers who must serve as more than law enforcers. Community Police Officers (CPOs) must also play the important roles of advisors, facilitators, and supporters of new community-based initiatives. The CPO has responsibility for a specific geographical area and works as a generalist who considers making arrests as only one of many options that can be use, if only temporarily, to address community problems. As the community's conduit for positive change, the COP enlists citizens in the process of policing themselves.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of constitutional criminal procedure is the study of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and opinions. This course is designed primarily as a supplementary course for undergraduate and graduate students taking a criminal procedure course whose main interest consists of U.S. Supreme Court cases. Reading law cases-a daunting task even for first-year law students-is a significant intellectual challenge for non-law students, especially if the criminal procedure class is their first law course. This course provides a guide to the U.S. Supreme Court cases that students are likely to encounter in a criminal procedure course. The decisions are stated succinctly and with enough basic reasoning to grasp the direction of the decision-making process. There are many benefits to the case method approach in which students read original source material. Such benefits include gaining in-depth knowledge of the reasoning process by which constitutional rules are formulated, a sharpening of critical thinking skills through the analysis of the justices' written opinions, and improving students' reading comprehension levels and writing skills. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students master the traditional five-paragraph essay and variations of this essay. Four principles are presented as keys to effective writing: unity, support, coherence, and sentence skills. The first part of the course focuses on the first three principles and to some extent on sentence skills. It shows, respectively, how these four principles apply in the different patterns of essay development and in specialized types of writing.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the systems of the human body including the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, immune, urinary and reproductive systems. Fundamentals of fluid and electrolyte balance, cellular communication, human nutrition and gene inheritance will also be presented. The structure, function, and integration of these systems in both health and disease will be discussed. This course is a continuation of BIO201. 

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such. This course is a continuation of BIO201L.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO202, which is the complementary didactic course.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis or microbial anatomy, microbial disease, and disease prevention.  The course includes a broad overview of both the historical and current  field of microbiology with focus on microbial pathogenicity, the spread of microbial pathogens, the methods of human immunity, and best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of microbial disease.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the basic components of the human body and how it functions on a cellular level to organismal level.  The fundamentals of chemistry, biochemistry and cell biology will be presented along with the skeletal, muscular, nervous and integumentary systems.   Structure, function, and integration of these systems in health and disease will also be discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO201, which is the complementary didactic course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Since the discovery of inheritance, the field of Genetics has greatly increased our understanding of human diversity, health, and the transmission of disease.  In this course, the student will examine the molecular mechanisms of inheritance, extensively survey the contribution of genetics to disease, and review the current contributions of genetics to the treatment of disease. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

3 Credits

This course provides comprehensive coverage of personal financial planning in the areas of money management, career planning, taxes, consumer credit, housing and other consumer decisions, legal protection, insurance, investments, retirement planning, and estate planning. The goal is to teach the fundamentals of financial planning so students can make informed choices related to spending, saving, borrowing, and investing that lead to long-term financial security. Provided financial planning tools help identify and evaluate choices as well as understand the consequences of decisions in terms of opportunity costs.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This statistics course is designed to prepare the nurse to understand statistical concepts and apply them to nursing issues, through analysis of data, statistics, and journal articles. Assignments are applied to nursing practice situations and patient care to move the student from the conceptual to the applied level of evidence-based practice. The student learns to describe issues and make inferences using statistics. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

3 Credits

Concepts of Fundamental Mathematics will be a review of fundamental math concepts for some students and may break new ground for others. Students of all backgrounds will be delighted to find an approach that appeals to all learning styles and reaches out to diverse demographics. Through down-to-earth explanations, patient skill-building, and exceptionally interesting and realistic applications, this course will empower students to learn and master mathematics in the real world.  Textbook is offered free online & does not need to be purchased separately.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to be an introduction to a wide variety of issues that confront today's modern police manager. The complex nature of policing in modern society mandates a thorough understanding of such issues as organizational culture, leadership styles, transactional analysis, problem identification and decision making, management by objectives, productivity, fiscal management, civil liability, accreditation, and ethics, to name but a few. This course will explore these issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces students to the corrections system. The growing population of prisoners constitutes a management challenge for all law enforcement communities, and a potential source of governmental liability. This course discusses the historical development of corrections, and examines the goals of criminal sentencing, the management of jails and prisons, the concept of alternative sentencing, guidelines on prisoner rights, and issues associated with parole and probation.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on one of the most revolutionary models of policing we have seen in many decades. Community policing is not merely a means of better addressing community needs, but a philosophy that turns traditional policing on its head by empowering the community rather than dictating to the community. In this way, policing derives its role and priorities from the community rather than dictating to the community what the police role will be. Community policing requires a new breed of police officers who must serve as more than law enforcers. Community Police Officers (CPOs) must also play the important roles of advisors, facilitators, and supporters of new community-based initiatives. The CPO has responsibility for a specific geographical area and works as a generalist who considers making arrests as only one of many options that can be use, if only temporarily, to address community problems. As the community's conduit for positive change, the COP enlists citizens in the process of policing themselves.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of constitutional criminal procedure is the study of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and opinions. This course is designed primarily as a supplementary course for undergraduate and graduate students taking a criminal procedure course whose main interest consists of U.S. Supreme Court cases. Reading law cases-a daunting task even for first-year law students-is a significant intellectual challenge for non-law students, especially if the criminal procedure class is their first law course. This course provides a guide to the U.S. Supreme Court cases that students are likely to encounter in a criminal procedure course. The decisions are stated succinctly and with enough basic reasoning to grasp the direction of the decision-making process. There are many benefits to the case method approach in which students read original source material. Such benefits include gaining in-depth knowledge of the reasoning process by which constitutional rules are formulated, a sharpening of critical thinking skills through the analysis of the justices' written opinions, and improving students' reading comprehension levels and writing skills. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores ethical standards and codes in criminal justice professions. Students will study cases to illustrate ethical issues, and derive solutions to ethical dilemmas using critical thinking. The student will be given a critical perspective of how constituent parts interrelate in a framework of questions about moral and ethical conduct.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the systems of the human body including the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, immune, urinary and reproductive systems. Fundamentals of fluid and electrolyte balance, cellular communication, human nutrition and gene inheritance will also be presented. The structure, function, and integration of these systems in both health and disease will be discussed. This course is a continuation of BIO201. 

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such. This course is a continuation of BIO201L.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO202, which is the complementary didactic course.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers principles of microbiology with emphasis or microbial anatomy, microbial disease, and disease prevention.  The course includes a broad overview of both the historical and current  field of microbiology with focus on microbial pathogenicity, the spread of microbial pathogens, the methods of human immunity, and best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of microbial disease.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the basic components of the human body and how it functions on a cellular level to organismal level.  The fundamentals of chemistry, biochemistry and cell biology will be presented along with the skeletal, muscular, nervous and integumentary systems.   Structure, function, and integration of these systems in health and disease will also be discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of the laboratory portion of this course is to explore histology in a hands on manner under the microscope and to explore the gross anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, nervous system, and special senses.  While much of the physiology and microscopic anatomy of this course is covered in the lecture portion, the lab is designed to fill in the gaps and focus more on anatomical structures and recognition of such.  This course must be taken concurrently with BIO201, which is the complementary didactic course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Since the discovery of inheritance, the field of Genetics has greatly increased our understanding of human diversity, health, and the transmission of disease.  In this course, the student will examine the molecular mechanisms of inheritance, extensively survey the contribution of genetics to disease, and review the current contributions of genetics to the treatment of disease. **Textbook is available in the classroom**

3 Credits

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

In this course we focus on grammar, sentence structure, and other aspects of the "mechanics" of English. Our emphasis is on creating arguments that persuade, convince, and inspire. The goal of this course is to develop writing skills that enable students to develop powerful arguments that are more than just correct; they produce the results intended. We identify the fixed types of questions that an argument can address, helping students to build writing projects around the need to develop answers to significant questions concerning facts, definitions, causes, values, and actions. These questions form a logical progression - questions of fact and definition must be settled before questions of cause can be addressed, and so on - which means that they can serve as the basis of a sequence of assignments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces the student to the dynamic field of criminology that changes constantly with each release of major research studies, Supreme Court rulings, and governmental policy, not to mention the current events of everyday life. Criminologists spend their career trying to understand what drives people to commit crime. This introductory course will provide insights into the answers, and will help students to think critically about law and justice. At the end of this course, students should have developed a critical perspective toward the social and legal institutions entrusted with crime control.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to be an introduction to a wide variety of issues that confront today's modern police manager. The complex nature of policing in modern society mandates a thorough understanding of such issues as organizational culture, leadership styles, transactional analysis, problem identification and decision making, management by objectives, productivity, fiscal management, civil liability, accreditation, and ethics, to name but a few. This course will explore these issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces students to the corrections system. The growing population of prisoners constitutes a management challenge for all law enforcement communities, and a potential source of governmental liability. This course discusses the historical development of corrections, and examines the goals of criminal sentencing, the management of jails and prisons, the concept of alternative sentencing, guidelines on prisoner rights, and issues associated with parole and probation.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on one of the most revolutionary models of policing we have seen in many decades. Community policing is not merely a means of better addressing community needs, but a philosophy that turns traditional policing on its head by empowering the community rather than dictating to the community. In this way, policing derives its role and priorities from the community rather than dictating to the community what the police role will be. Community policing requires a new breed of police officers who must serve as more than law enforcers. Community Police Officers (CPOs) must also play the important roles of advisors, facilitators, and supporters of new community-based initiatives. The CPO has responsibility for a specific geographical area and works as a generalist who considers making arrests as only one of many options that can be use, if only temporarily, to address community problems. As the community's conduit for positive change, the COP enlists citizens in the process of policing themselves.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of constitutional criminal procedure is the study of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and opinions. This course is designed primarily as a supplementary course for undergraduate and graduate students taking a criminal procedure course whose main interest consists of U.S. Supreme Court cases. Reading law cases-a daunting task even for first-year law students-is a significant intellectual challenge for non-law students, especially if the criminal procedure class is their first law course. This course provides a guide to the U.S. Supreme Court cases that students are likely to encounter in a criminal procedure course. The decisions are stated succinctly and with enough basic reasoning to grasp the direction of the decision-making process. There are many benefits to the case method approach in which students read original source material. Such benefits include gaining in-depth knowledge of the reasoning process by which constitutional rules are formulated, a sharpening of critical thinking skills through the analysis of the justices' written opinions, and improving students' reading comprehension levels and writing skills. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a framework of information about technology and computers and specifically how they are used by criminals and law enforcement agencies. The course provides a classic book on police technology, suppemented with modern innovations. This allows a comparative approach to use of technology in policing, and recognition of the somewhat slow pace of approval to use new technologies against citizens.  It examines basic computer concepts and design, networking and information exchange, and then delves into more advanced and crime-specific technologies such as wiretaps, surveillance, and the use of technology in high-tech crimes, disaster response, and police protection. The study of technology is integrated into wider criminal justice themes: ethical and legal implications of technology; technology's place in the community based policing model; and, how technology impacts traditional criminal justice theories.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to be an introduction to a wide variety of issues that confront today's modern police manager. The complex nature of policing in modern society mandates a thorough understanding of such issues as organizational culture, leadership styles, transactional analysis, problem identification and decision making, management by objectives, productivity, fiscal management, civil liability, accreditation, and ethics, to name but a few. This course will explore these issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces students to the corrections system. The growing population of prisoners constitutes a management challenge for all law enforcement communities, and a potential source of governmental liability. This course discusses the historical development of corrections, and examines the goals of criminal sentencing, the management of jails and prisons, the concept of alternative sentencing, guidelines on prisoner rights, and issues associated with parole and probation.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on one of the most revolutionary models of policing we have seen in many decades. Community policing is not merely a means of better addressing community needs, but a philosophy that turns traditional policing on its head by empowering the community rather than dictating to the community. In this way, policing derives its role and priorities from the community rather than dictating to the community what the police role will be. Community policing requires a new breed of police officers who must serve as more than law enforcers. Community Police Officers (CPOs) must also play the important roles of advisors, facilitators, and supporters of new community-based initiatives. The CPO has responsibility for a specific geographical area and works as a generalist who considers making arrests as only one of many options that can be use, if only temporarily, to address community problems. As the community's conduit for positive change, the COP enlists citizens in the process of policing themselves.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of constitutional criminal procedure is the study of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and opinions. This course is designed primarily as a supplementary course for undergraduate and graduate students taking a criminal procedure course whose main interest consists of U.S. Supreme Court cases. Reading law cases-a daunting task even for first-year law students-is a significant intellectual challenge for non-law students, especially if the criminal procedure class is their first law course. This course provides a guide to the U.S. Supreme Court cases that students are likely to encounter in a criminal procedure course. The decisions are stated succinctly and with enough basic reasoning to grasp the direction of the decision-making process. There are many benefits to the case method approach in which students read original source material. Such benefits include gaining in-depth knowledge of the reasoning process by which constitutional rules are formulated, a sharpening of critical thinking skills through the analysis of the justices' written opinions, and improving students' reading comprehension levels and writing skills. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

Effective law enforcement requires a basic understanding of the fundamental laws of the land. This course provides the overview of legal guidelines and protections enshrined in the US Constitution, from which all American criminal law is derived. Students will explore the theory of governmental authority that underpins the Constitution, and the evolution of Constitutional rights as codified in the Constitutional amendments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

3 Credits
Required Books

Welcome to Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. The class will explore how crime is addressed and adjudicated in selected countries bearing varied cultural perspectives. It is important to understand the diversity of how human beings respond to acts of criminality within their culture. Through this form of comparative benchmarking the student will analyze and evaluate the United States’ criminal justice system with that of other cultures. Students will also critically examine contemporary issues shared across the studied countries and thoughtfully create their own recommendations to address those issues. COURSE OBJECTIVES: The student should be able to: · Identify the varying levels of criminality across cultures and how that might shape criminal justice systems. · Articulate the value of comparing the application of various criminal justice systems and the utility of knowing the associated outcomes of those practices. · Evaluate the integrity of sources of international criminal justice statistics. · Understand the importance of the sources of various criminal justice systems to their formation. · Differentiate the methods used to address juvenile justice across the studied countries. · Assess the ramifications of being incarcerated in various countries. · Analyze alternative approaches to criminal justice in a manner that promotes consideration, and possibly synthesis, of these alternatives when confronted with issues of crime. · Understand the role terrorism plays in tactical and strategic planning of criminal justice activities. · Explore both the need for collaboration and limitations inherent to trans-border coordination to address transnational crime. · Evaluate the role of leaders in the criminal justice system by considering the many responsibilities accounted for when selecting appropriate courses of action. Expected Prerequisites in course sequence: CJ110 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ120 Introduction to Law Enforcement

3 Credits
Required Books

With all of the knowledge taught in law enforcement academies and criminal justice training centers throughout the United States, the principles of interviewing and interrogating suspects always seem to attract little or no attention. For that reason, this course on kinesic interviewing equips the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques needed for conducting effective interviews and interrogations. It is vital to any case that investigators obtain essential information from victims, witnesses, and informants, and confessions from suspects in such a way as to stand up to court scrutiny.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course builds on the foundations established in Constitutional Law I by taking the students through a series of legal case studies to gain an appreciation of how the legal system works in practice. The objective of these case studies is to provide the students with the insights that come from courtroom experience so that they are better prepared to find, collect, and handle evidence in a way that will facilitate criminal conviction.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed for understanding the code of criminal law that police officers must deal with as an integral part of their career. This course addresses the body of criminal law that affects police agencies and the criminal justice system. This course is divided into eight modules.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on understanding and managing diversity. Clearly, diversity is an interdisciplinary field. Much of its theoretical framework originates in the social sciences. There is some disagreement among scholars on the definition of diversity; much less what materials should be included in a course about diversity. To meet this challenge we have selected a text for this course that gathers a wealth of information from the salient issues surrounding the topic of diversity in a law enforcement setting.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an up-to-date introduction to cultural anthropology and carefully balances coverage of core topics with contemporary changes in the field. No single theoretical perspective orients this course so a wide range of views and approaches can be applied effectively.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course examines the full spectrum of religions, from small-scale societies to full-blown “world religious movements.” The course provides an in-depth treatment of Islam, Hinduism and includes study of real life field projects directly related to material covered in the course.

3 Credits
Required Books

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course in sociology gives students the opportunity to use sociological imagination to master their social world. It examines aspects of the social environment that students might otherwise ignore, neglect, or take for granted. It looks beneath the surface of everyday life to help students understand and anticipate human behavior in a variety of environments.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on resource-allocation, strategic, and tactical decisions that are made by analysts, managers, and consultants. The techniques discussed here seek to achieve the objectives of the organization in the most efficient manner, while considering both explicit and implicit constraints. This course emphasizes real-world business applications - not just theories and concepts.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the many voices of psychology. To some, the science of psychology provides its students with a better understanding of others' behaviors. Others view psychology as a pathway to self-understanding. Others see the potential for a future career, and some are drawn to psychology by the opportunity for intellectual discovery that its study provides. The overall goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview to the subject of psychology.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid overview of the juvenile justice system in the United States. It presents the historical background of the U.S. juvenile justice system, its current status, as well as contemporary societal and legal debates. An examination of various policies, programs, and practices is provided throughout the text. The course includes coverage of juvenile law and procedure, juvenile corrections, juvenile delinquency, delinquency prevention, and the future of juvenile justice in the United States. This knowledge will serve you well as a strong foundation for other more specialized courses in juvenile justice and the social sciences. The need for post-secondary juvenile justice education becomes more evident every day as the law changes and new forms of crime emerge to befuddle the best efforts of those charged with dealing with crime.

3 Credits
Required Books

This is an introductory course to criminalistics which explores the history and scope of forensic science. Criminalistics or forensic science is the application of science to those criminal and civil laws that are enforced by police agencies in a criminal justice system. The scope of this course includes discovery at a crime scene, the most important location of evidence; physical evidence; analytical techniques for organic and inorganic materials; forensic toxicology; and firearms, ammunition, unique tool marks, and various impressions (e.g., shoe prints, fabric properties, and bloodstains).

3 Credits
Required Books

This course builds on the foundations laid in Criminal Law by exploring the principles and rules associated with the management of criminal evidence. Topics covered in this course include the collection of evidence, how to handle evidence to prevent contamination, chain of custody, and preparation of evidence for presentation in the courtroom to attain criminal convictions. The rules of evidence are thoroughly discussed. The scope of the course encompasses physical evidence, witness testimony, polygraphs and technical evidence.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores criminal investigation including the role of the investigator, physical and testimonial evidence, and preservation and collection of evidence at crime scenes. It examines the uses of people, records and files as sources of information and the proper uses of interrogation. The course describes surveillance as a fact finding tool and the use of eye witnesses. The course concludes with a description of methods for reconstructing what happened in the context of crime and provides an in-depth discussion of the most feared social crime: homicide. Criminal Investigation I prepares you to study the more complex subject matter presented in Criminal Investigation II.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course builds on the fundamentals of criminal investigation that were studied in Criminal Investigation I, and illustrates their application to some of the special issues presently plaguing law enforcement worldwide (e.g. terrorism and enterprise crime).

3 Credits
Required Books

The role of a first responder is a special one. While the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system is comprised of a talented team of many individuals at different certification levels, the First Responder is the one who arrives on the scene of an emergency first. This is a unique responsibility, one for which specialized training is required. In addition to providing information about emergency care for the First Responder, this course will also discuss issues about staying safe while at the scene of an emergency.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed to understand and succeed in the field of private and public security. Introduction to Security is divided into eight Modules corresponding to three parts: 1) Introduction and Security's Function, 2) The Basics of Defense, and 3) Specific Threats and Solutions. In this interesting course, you will realize the drastic changes that have occurred in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon that have shaken the security industry-both private and governmental.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of methods for processing a homicide investigation. This course guides the student through the procedure used by investigators upon arriving on the scene of a violent and sudden death. Guidelines are provided on how to manage the scene, analyze evidence to determine the likely cause of death, and initiate the process of identifying the perpetrator.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course and accompanying readings interweave two stories: the story of our interactions with nature and the story of our interactions with each other. The environment-centered story is about humans distancing themselves from the rest of nature and searching for a relationship that strikes a balance between constructive and destructive exploitation. The culture-centered story is about how human cultures have become mutually influential and yet mutually differentiating. Both stories have been going on for thousands of years and will provide a well-rounded course in world history.  The textbook for this course will be available in the classroom.

3 Credits

This course is intended to enrich student learning through their active engagement with ideas in written text. This course provides students with multi-genre reading experiences designed to immerse them in critical and creative thinking as they address problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Students will be encouraged to see language as a way to create meaning in their lives and to see themselves as writers with a purpose and an audience.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to be an introduction to a wide variety of issues that confront today's modern police manager. The complex nature of policing in modern society mandates a thorough understanding of such issues as organizational culture, leadership styles, transactional analysis, problem identification and decision making, management by objectives, productivity, fiscal management, civil liability, accreditation, and ethics, to name but a few. This course will explore these issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

The Global War on Terror has posed new challenges for law enforcement organizations to contribute, along with military forces, to the homeland security of the United States. The purpose of this course is to offer the latest information on the technology, weapons (including weapons of mass destruction), transportation modes of terrorists, and profiles of terrorists themselves. Likely trends in 21st Century terrorism and the law enforcement response are also discussed.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on environmental issues such as global climate change, geology, minerals, and mining. This course aims to provide a basis of knowledge on environment issues and hone the skills needed to make informed decisions on environmental issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is an introductory course covering a wide spectrum of alternative energy sources. At the end of this course, the students will be able to demonstrate a general level of understanding of renewable energy technologies; solar, wind, tidal, wave geothermal etc. An appreciation of the socio-economic issues associated with the widespread use of renewable energy will also be gained. The students will develop specific skills necessary to assimilate scientific and engineering concepts, to model these concepts mathematically and to form a rigorous solution, along with the ability to assess the practical limitations of such solutions.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to help students learn chemical skills and concepts by studying the connection between key concepts and key problem-solving skills through critical thinking. Basic math and problem solving skills will be covered in order to lay a foundation for the study of a variety of diverse chemistry concepts including the periodic table, chemical bonding, and stoichiometry of gases.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the relationship between our sense of self and how we communicate. It suggests that the self evolves and changes over time based on our interactions with others, and that we can play an active role in shaping our identities, abilities, and esteem. It explores the relationship between communication and perception, the process of assigning meaning to sensory information and experiences. It explores good listening skills, which are important in both our professional and personal lives. Because being an effective communicator requires the use of appropriate, responsible, and ethical language, this course offers strategies for using language responsibly. The process you will use to prepare and deliver a classroom speech is the same as that needed in professional and civic contexts. Careful preparation is the foundation of an effective speech.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on the skills and strategies that managers need in today’s workplace. The role of communications will be explored, as well as an examination of effective communications in hiring and promoting, conflict management, presentations, routine messages, and reporting and proposals. Studies consistently report the importance of communication to business success, and managers frequently correlate communications proficiency with career satisfaction and progress. This course builds that ability central to managers as they pursue goals and objectives.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course serves as an introduction to computer terminology and computer equipment and provides fundamental concepts for using PC-based software. Topics covered include computer hardware and its operation, operating systems, application software, networks and computer communications, and the Internet and the World Wide Web. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers to assist with business issues. The impact of computers on our lives is also explored.

3 Credits

Using an interdisciplinary approach that emphasizes culture and family, Human Development challenges students to understand development from a broader perspective. Students draw on their own experiences as they weigh the research and ideas presented in the course. The course explores controversies about human development, often within a specific cultural context. Also incorporated into each module are questions that link development concepts with addiction related counseling strategies. The material covered includes competency-building activities, offering prospective addiction counselors multiple opportunities to develop practical and necessary skills.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate diverse ethical positions different from those they may have been acculturated into. Topics studied include issues such as abortion, euthanasia, racial discrimination and injustice as well human rights, war and violence, gender issues and human cloning. This course is designed to use current ethical issues as a means to help students think critically about ethical issues in the real world.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course introduces students to the corrections system. The growing population of prisoners constitutes a management challenge for all law enforcement communities, and a potential source of governmental liability. This course discusses the historical development of corrections, and examines the goals of criminal sentencing, the management of jails and prisons, the concept of alternative sentencing, guidelines on prisoner rights, and issues associated with parole and probation.

3 Credits
Required Books

The management of human resources is critical for companies to provide ""value"" to customers, shareholders, employees, and the community where they are located. Value includes not only profits but also employee growth and satisfaction, creation of new jobs, protection of the environment, and contributions to community programs. All aspects of human resource management including acquiring, preparing, developing, and compensating employees can help companies meet their competitive challenges and create value. Also, effective human resource management requires an awareness of broader contextual issues affecting business such as changes in the labor force, legal issues, and globalization. Both the popular press and academic research show that effective human resource management practices do result in greater value for shareholders and employees.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course explores the aspects and impacts of CRM. It examines how Web 2.0 technologies and social media tools are being woven into CRM strategies. The course identifies the new business models being used by the most successful companies and also provides guidance on how other companies can and should adopt these innovations. Students will explore companies that are providing the best tools, provide various recommendations and insights and present insightful interviews with industry leaders on how to establish and maintain customer relationships.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course focuses on one of the most revolutionary models of policing we have seen in many decades. Community policing is not merely a means of better addressing community needs, but a philosophy that turns traditional policing on its head by empowering the community rather than dictating to the community. In this way, policing derives its role and priorities from the community rather than dictating to the community what the police role will be. Community policing requires a new breed of police officers who must serve as more than law enforcers. Community Police Officers (CPOs) must also play the important roles of advisors, facilitators, and supporters of new community-based initiatives. The CPO has responsibility for a specific geographical area and works as a generalist who considers making arrests as only one of many options that can be use, if only temporarily, to address community problems. As the community's conduit for positive change, the COP enlists citizens in the process of policing themselves.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course continues with basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation, and sentence structure with assignments geared towards speaking Spanish in real life settings.

3 Credits
Required Books

This introductory course focuses directly on the crime picture in America and the three traditional elements of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. The course is divided into eight modules corresponding with the major issues of criminal justice including an introductory study of the definition of criminal justice, the crime picture in America, and the nature and purpose of criminal law and how the guilty are handled.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is on thinking about and understanding your physical surroundings. It is a straightforward but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science course and will introduce basic concepts and key ideas while providing opportunities to learn reasoning skills and a new way of thinking about your environment.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides an introduction to basic conversational Spanish. Students will study vocabulary, verb conjugation and sentence structure with a focus on practice of Spanish speaking in real life situations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course provides a foundation of factual knowledge about biology in order to help students build a cognitive framework for critical scientific thinking. Students will learn key biological terms and theories and exhibit understanding of these terms through assignments that incorporate case studies, essays and ethics questions concerning current biological issues.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course is designed to provide students an overview of the field of statistics and its many applications. This course is applications oriented and written with the needs of the non-mathematician in mind. Although the course is applications-orientated, we have taken care to provide a sound methodological development and to use notation that is generally accepted for the topic being covered. Students will find that this course provides a good preparation for the study of more advanced material.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course offers content in pharmacology which meets the needs of the allied health student. The focused approach of this course provides students with the perfect blend of content and practical exercises which promote understanding of pharmacology concepts. A focused approach introduces the history of pharmacology, discussing the legal and ethical principles involved, illustrating drug administration techniques, reviewing math, and explaining drug calculations.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course puts the humanities in perspective by discussing the arts and ways of knowing art's main concerns, purposes, and functions. The course also discusses artistic style and how to apply critical skills. This course is designed for students with little or no background in the arts.

3 Credits
Required Books

Part II of American History covers the rise of industrial America, up to the post-cold-war era. The course visually represents complex and controversial decisions and underscores that historical events were contingent on human agency, and not inevitable. Topics include New York’s decision to ratify the Constitution, female suffragists’ decision to withhold support for the Fifteenth Amendment, and President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Japan. It also presents students with excerpts from key primary source documents to exemplify conflicting visions of America. This feature helps students to recognize that Americans have always debated the course of action their country should take to remain true to its founding principles.

3 Credits
Required Books

We believe the combination of performance and team management can produce dramatic improvement in organizational success. Too often performance management programs are more about classifying or categorizing employees rather than improving their performance. These approaches tend to be administrative in nature, rather than tools managers can use to improve performance. In today's organizations, teams - not the individual - have become the basic unit of performance management. As a result, team building and development has become critical. This course addresses two of the most important challenges managers face. The first half of the course is devoted to managing performance toward achieving the organization's strategic objectives. The second half of the course is focused on creating, developing, and leading high-performance teams.

3 Credits
Required Books

This course prompts students to question their own assumptions and to enlarge their thinking through the analysis of the most common problems associated with everyday reasoning. Three main concepts include the fundamentals of critical thinking, common barriers to critical thinking, and strategies for overcoming those barriers. Critical Thinking outlines persuasion through rhetoric and understanding the details of deductive and inductive argumentation and logic. Further, students delve into causal explanation, explanatory adequacy and forming hypotheses. Major perspectives in moral reasoning, consequentialism, legal morality, religious relativism and religious absolutism are covered along with virtue ethics.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of constitutional criminal procedure is the study of U.S. Supreme Court decisions and opinions. This course is designed primarily as a supplementary course for undergraduate and graduate students taking a criminal procedure course whose main interest consists of U.S. Supreme Court cases. Reading law cases-a daunting task even for first-year law students-is a significant intellectual challenge for non-law students, especially if the criminal procedure class is their first law course. This course provides a guide to the U.S. Supreme Court cases that students are likely to encounter in a criminal procedure course. The decisions are stated succinctly and with enough basic reasoning to grasp the direction of the decision-making process. There are many benefits to the case method approach in which students read original source material. Such benefits include gaining in-depth knowledge of the reasoning process by which constitutional rules are formulated, a sharpening of critical thinking skills through the analysis of the justices' written opinions, and improving students' reading comprehension levels and writing skills. 

3 Credits
Required Books

This course covers American history from the 1500s to post Civil War Reconstruction. You will study a diverse range of cultures from these time periods and how migrations, social and economic changes and interactions between cultures have shaped the history of America. You will study the shifting frontiers and political landscapes of the land before and after the Revolution and examining associated patterns to form a big picture of the historical story of America.

3 Credits
Required Books

The study of organized crime is one of the most fascinating educational endeavors, posing thematic, scholarly, and ideological questions. As we attempt to understand this area of interest, bear in mind that during the past century organized crime became the most insidious form of criminality involving criminals, politicians, bankers, lawyers, and the all-important users of illegal goods and services. The problem of organized crime is examined from a social perspective using specially designed pedagogical features that you will find in the text. These include objectives, critical thinking projects, chapter summaries, key terms, points of discussion, and suggested readings for the student. You will encounter a considerable amount of material on the topics of emerging groups, redefining organized crime (OC), drug-trafficking cartels, Chinese OC, Nigerian drug traffickers, Albanian drug-smuggling networks, organized crime and the Bushes, Tri-border Area OC activity along with updated case studies, statistics, and graphics.

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this course is to equip the criminal justice student with a complete and practical set of procedures and techniques that are needed after a homicide scene has been processed. The student proceeds through information relevant to the follow-up work necessary for preparing a solid case for presentation in court and the attainment of a homicide conviction.

3 Credits
Required Books

One of the guiding premises of this course is that the range of activities that can fall under the heading of white collar crime is more pervasive and more costly to society than are conventional crime and deviance. The study of white collar crime should obviously be of interest to students planning criminal justice careers and to people already employed in the criminal justice system. As the investigation and prosecution of white collar crime increases, career opportunities for individuals well informed about this type of activity should expand. The law in the white collar realm that confronts pre-law and law students is especially dynamic and complex. The problem of corporate liability poses special difficulties, and the subtle and sometimes arbitrary lines of demarcation between criminal law and civil law are crucial aspects of the study of white collar crime. The study of white collar crime is likely to be of interest to students of the social and behavioral sciences because white collar criminality, as it is defined here, often involves human behavior in its most devious and diabolical forms. Finally, as citizens, employees, employers, and professionals, most of us are likely to be affected more by white collar crime than by any other type of criminal activity. Prerequisite: All Required Liberal Arts and 100/200-Level Courses

3 Credits
Required Books

The purpose of this individualized learning experience is to enable you, as an Aspen student well along the way toward the completion of your degree requirements, to develop an original comprehensive research project on a topic of professional or personal interest. This project-based course is designed to encourage you to draw upon knowledge and experience that you have gained over the course of your studies with Aspen. The project also allows you to integrate your other related educational or professional development activities. Projects are intended to be of an applied and pragmatic nature and we hope that the outcome and findings of your research will be of value to you, either in connection with your own organizational situation, or personally such as in the exploration of entrepreneurial opportunities.

3 Credits